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76 IEP Goals Every Educator Should Have in Their Goal Bank

All the goals you need, when you need them.

When given up to 10 objects, [STUDENT] will count and state how many objects there are (verbally, pointing).

There are as many IEP goals as there are students. But the longer you teach special education, the more you’ll find yourself searching for just the right reading comprehension goal for a student with a learning disability or a behavior goal for a kid with ADHD. That’s where an IEP goal bank, also known as a goal database, comes in.

IEP Goals 101

IEP goals should be specific enough to be implemented by anyone who reads them. They should address aspects of the general curriculum but at the student’s functional level. And the goals should be actionable and measurable.

problem solving skills iep goals

From: https://cultivateadvisors.com/blog/5-steps-to-writing-smart-business-goals/

The goals should also include the accuracy and number of trials that the student needs to complete to show mastery. The accuracy and number of trials will depend on the student’s ability, strengths, and skills. (Typical accuracy and trials are 80% 4-out-of-5 trials.)

Finally, the goals should include the level of support the student needs. Should they be demonstrating the skill independently, or do they need a few prompts, or maximum support? Build that into the goal too.

So, a finished goal might be: When given a pile of coins (all one type), Jaime will count the coins and find the total with no more than two prompts with 70% accuracy in 3 out of 5 trials.

Flow chart featuring a formula for writing IEP goals for your goal bank.

IEP Goal Formula from www.adayinourshoes.com

IEP Goals for Your Database

A lot of thought goes into each IEP goal, so here are 76 goals that every special education teacher should have in their bank.

Reading IEP Goal Bank

  • When given a story at their reading level, [STUDENT] will use a storyboard or story map to outline the story’s main elements.
  • When given a nonfiction text at their reading level, [STUDENT] will select and use the appropriate graphic organizer to identify key information.
  • When given a paragraph at their reading level, [STUDENT] will apply the RAP strategy ( R eading a single paragraph, A sking oneself to define the main idea and supporting details, P utting the information into the reader’s language).
  • When given a paragraph at their reading level, [STUDENT] will apply QAR (question-and-answer relationship) strategy to answer questions.

Reading IEP Goal Bank

  • When given a passage at their reading level, [STUDENT] will use an outline strategy to summarize the content or retell the story.
  • When given a text at their reading level, [STUDENT] will read and demonstrate literal knowledge by answering five literal questions.
  • [STUDENT] will demonstrate understanding of text using total communication (AAC devices, PECS, verbalization, sign language) to answer five literal questions about the text.
  • When presented with a passage at their reading level, [STUDENT] will use context clues to identify the meaning of unknown words.
  • When given a passage at their instructional level, [STUDENT] will make a prediction and read to confirm or adjust their prediction with information from the text.
  • When given a text at their reading level, [STUDENT] will identify the main idea and two supporting details.

Math IEP Goal Bank

  • Given a passage at their reading level, [STUDENT] will answer five inferential questions.
  • After reading a passage with visual supports (e.g, highlighting), [STUDENT] will answer literal questions with minimal assistance.
  • After reading a passage at their reading level, [STUDENT] will identify the author’s purpose for writing.

Math IEP Goal Bank

  • [STUDENT] will identify the number (verbally, pointing, written).
  • [STUDENT] will rote count from 1 to 25 (or higher).
  • [STUDENT] will skip count by 2, 3, 5, 10 to 50 (verbal or written).

When given up to 10 objects, [STUDENT] will count and state how many objects there are (verbally, pointing).

  • Given 10 addition problems, [STUDENT] will independently add single-digit numbers with (or without) regrouping.
  • [STUDENT] will independently subtract a single-digit number from a double-digit number with (or without) regrouping.
  • Given 10 subtraction problems, [STUDENT] will independently subtract double-digit numbers from double-digit numbers with (or without) regrouping.
  • [STUDENT] will independently tell time to the half hour (or quarter hour, etc.) on an analog clock (verbal or written).
  • [STUDENT] will independently identify the next dollar amount when given a price, determine how much is needed to make a purchase, and count out the necessary amount using school money.
  • Given a quarter, dime, nickel, and penny, [STUDENT] will identify the coin and value.
  • Given a random amount of coins (all one type or mixed), [STUDENT] will independently count the coins.

problem solving skills iep goals

  • When given two-digit (or three- or four-digit) numbers, [STUDENT] will round to the nearest tens (or hundreds or thousands).
  • Given two numbers (pictures, groups of items), [STUDENT] will determine which number is greater than/less than/equal to by selecting or drawing the appropriate symbol.
  • Given data and a graph (bar, pie), [STUDENT] will complete the graph to display the data.
  • Given a graph (bar, pie, line), [STUDENT] will answer three questions about the data.
  • [STUDENT] will identify the numerator and denominator in a fraction.
  • When given a picture of a shape divided into parts, [STUDENT] will color the correct number of sections to represent the fraction given.

Math IEP Goal Bank

  • [STUDENT] will solve one-step word problems using addition and subtraction (or multiplication and division).
  • [STUDENT] will independently solve 15 multiplication facts (up to 9).

Writing IEP Goal Bank

  • [STUDENT] will use a keyword outline to write a paragraph with at least [number of] sentences, including an introduction/topic sentence and conclusion sentence.

Writing IEP Goal Bank

  • [STUDENT] will dictate a response to a question and use talk-to-text to communicate at least three sentences about a topic.
  • [STUDENT] will write a three-paragraph essay about a topic that includes a clear introductory sentence, main idea, supporting details, and conclusion.
  • [STUDENT] will select and use the appropriate graphic organizers to organize ideas in response to a writing topic.

Writing IEP Goal Bank

  • When given a paragraph to revise, [STUDENT] will add transitional words and phrases to connect ideas in sentences (or paragraphs).

Behavior IEP Goal Bank

  • Given a self-monitoring checklist, [STUDENT] will demonstrate self-regulation during [# of sessions] across [# of months].

Behavior IEP Goal Bank

  • Given a token board, [STUDENT] will follow class rules to earn [# of tokens] for each 30-minute period in special and general education settings.
  • Given a self-regulation strategy (e.g., zones of regulation), [STUDENT] will identify when they are moving from green to red, and apply a self-regulation strategy to maintain their self-regulation.
  • Given support and a visual model, [STUDENT] will implement an organizational system for their locker/desk/backpack/binder.

Behavior IEP Goal Bank

  • Given scripts and reminders, [STUDENT] will manage frustration and disruptions to their routine during classroom activities.
  • Given a social story, [STUDENT] will be able to adjust to new routines and procedures in the classroom.

Social Skills IEP Goal Bank

  • During unstructured class time, [STUDENT] will engage in respectful conversation with peers (maintain personal space, use respectful voice).
  • During unstructured class time or play time (e.g., recess), [STUDENT] will engage with peers (participate, share, follow rules, take turns) for > 10 minutes with minimal adult prompting.

Social Skills IEP Goal Bank

  • During a preferred activity, [STUDENT] will invite a peer to join in during recess.
  • During a preferred activity, [STUDENT] will engage in appropriate conversation (ask appropriate questions, respond to questions, take turns) for > five turns.
  • When frustrated or involved in a conflict, [STUDENT] will resolve the conflict without aggression, but will apply a problem-solving strategy (walk away, tell a teacher).
  • [STUDENT] will demonstrate five back-and-forth exchanges with peers during structured play activities.

Social Skills IEP Goal Bank

Social-Emotional Skills Goal Bank

  • [STUDENT] will work cooperatively with peers in small-group settings (e.g., share materials, engage in conversation, accept others’ ideas).

Social-Emotional Skills Goal Bank

  • [STUDENT] will identify appropriate social rules and expectations for various social situations.
  • [STUDENT] will refrain from interrupting others.
  • [STUDENT] will identify emotions presented in picture form.

Social-Emotional Skills Goal Bank

  • [STUDENT] will engage in communication with others by asking questions when provided with the opportunities.
  • [STUDENT] will increase or maintain conversation about a preferred or nonpreferred topic.

Executive Functioning Goal Bank

Executive functioning skills are skills like planning, working memory, attention, problem-solving, mental flexibility, and self-regulation that help kids be successful in school. Students with poor executive functioning have a hard time with time management, organization, getting started with or finishing work, and connecting past experiences with current actions. (Know any kids like this?)

  • Given visual cues, [STUDENT] will implement an organizational system for organizing their backpack (locker, binder).
  • Given a task and a list of materials, [STUDENT] will gather the needed items to complete the task.

Executive Functioning Goal Bank

  • [STUDENT] will arrive at class with necessary materials (paper, pen, computer).
  • [STUDENT] will use a checklist (visual schedule) to independently complete classwork.
  • [STUDENT] will respond appropriately to oral commands.
  • [STUDENT] will ask for clarification and further explanation when needed.
  • [STUDENT] will request desired objects or instructional materials and equipment using [picture prompts, sign language, AAC device, etc].

Executive Functioning Goal Bank

  • [STUDENT] will express needs, wants, and feelings using [picture prompts, sign language, verbalization, etc].

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A lot of thought goes into each IEP goal, so here are 76 goals that every special education teacher should have in their bank.

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Executive Functioning IEP Goals: A Complete Guide and Goal Bank

problem solving skills iep goals

Executive functioning refers to a set of skills that are involved in planning, organizing, initiating, completing tasks, and regulating behavior. These skills are crucial for academic and social success, and individuals with executive functioning difficulties may struggle with daily life activities. For more in depth information on executive functioning coaching and outcomes, our Chief Clinical Officer, Dr. Jordan Wright has published a white paper that you can download it here .

IEP Goals for Executive Functioning

Individualized Education Program (IEP) goals are designed to address the specific needs of each student with a disability. When it comes to executive functioning, IEP goals may include:

  • Planning and organizing : The student will be able to independently create and follow a daily schedule or task list, including prioritizing tasks and breaking them down into smaller steps.
  • Initiation : The student will be able to start and complete tasks without excessive prompting or assistance from others.
  • Attention and focus : The student will be able to sustain attention and focus on a task for a specified period of time, and minimize distractions.
  • Time management : The student will be able to accurately estimate how long a task will take and manage their time effectively to complete it with limited prompting.
  • Self-regulation : The student will be able to recognize and control their own emotional responses, impulses, and behaviors in a variety of situations.
  • Problem-solving and decision-making : The student will be able to identify problems, generate and evaluate potential solutions, and make informed decisions.

These goals can be tailored to the individual needs of the student and may be adjusted over time as progress is made .

Utilize the SMART IEP Goal Model

When developing IEP goals for executive functioning skills, it is important to utilize the SMART goal model for increased success and accountability. Using this framework ensures that  the goals are Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-bound. SMART goals help to clarify what the student should achieve, how progress will be measured, and by when.

To help get your Special Education/IEP team get started, we’ve put together a SMART goal bank with executive functioning IEP goals for each age group. As always, you will need to modify these goals based on the student’s individual needs and your school’s resources.

After developing your IEP goals, you and your team will want to make sure you are properly tracking and monitoring the IEP SMART goals. For more information on how to do this successfully, check out our recent blog .

Example Executive Functioning IEP Goals for Primary Students

  • By the end of the school year, the student will demonstrate improved organization skills by independently creating and maintaining a daily schedule with at least 3 tasks to complete per day, with no more than 1 reminder needed per week.
  • By the end of the trimester,  the student will improve their time management skills by completing in-class assignments within the given time frame, with no more than 1 reminder needed per week.
  • After 9 weeks, the student will improve their ability to follow multi-step directions by accurately completing classroom tasks requiring at least 2-3 steps, with no more than 1 reminder needed per week.
  • By the end of the school year, the student will demonstrate improved working memory skills by recalling and following through on at least 2 multi-step directions given within a 5-minute period, with no more than 1 reminder needed per week.
  • By the end of the school year, the student will improve their self-monitoring skills by checking their work for errors before turning it in, with no more than 1 reminder needed per week.
  • By the end of the school year, the student will demonstrate improved attention and focus by remaining on-task for at least 5 minutes during independent work time, with no more than 1 reminder needed per week.
  • By the end of the school year, the student will improve their ability to shift focus and transition between tasks by independently switching to a new task when instructed to do so, with no more than 1 reminder needed per week.

Example Executive Functioning IEP Goals for Intermediate Students

  • By the end of the school year, the student will demonstrate improved planning and prioritization skills by creating and following through on a weekly schedule with at least 5 tasks to complete per week, with no more than 1 reminder needed per week.
  • By the end of the school year, the] will improve their time management skills by completing in-class assignments and homework within the given time frame, with no more than 1 reminder needed per week.
  • By the end of the trimester, the student will improve their ability to follow multi-step directions by accurately completing classroom tasks requiring at least 4 steps, with no more than 1 reminder needed per week.
  • By the end of the school year, the student will demonstrate improved working memory skills by recalling and following through on at least 3 multi-step directions given within a 10-minute period, with no more than 1 reminder needed per week.
  • By the end of the quarter, the student] will improve their self-monitoring skills by checking their work for errors and making appropriate revisions before turning it in, with no more than 1 reminder needed per week.
  • By the end of the school year, the student will demonstrate improved attention and focus by remaining on-task for at least 10 minutes during independent work time, with no more than 2 reminders needed per week.
  • By the end of the school year, the student will improve their decision-making skills by accurately identifying at least 3 solutions to a problem presented in class and choosing the most appropriate solution, with no more than 1 reminder needed per week.
  • By the end of the school year, the student will demonstrate improved emotional regulation skills by using at least 3 appropriate coping strategies when feeling frustrated or upset in class, with no more than 1 reminder needed per week.

Example Executive Functioning IEP Goals for Middle School Students

  • By the end of the school year, the student will demonstrate improved organization skills by independently creating and maintaining a weekly schedule with at least 5 tasks to complete per week, with no more than 1 reminder needed per week.
  • By the end of the school year, the student will improve their time management skills by completing in-class assignments and homework within the given time frame, with no more than 1 reminder needed per week.
  • By the end of the school year, the student will improve their ability to follow multi-step directions by accurately completing classroom tasks requiring at least 5 steps, with no more than 1 reminder needed per week.
  • By the end of the school year, the student will demonstrate improved working memory skills by recalling and following through on at least 4 multi-step directions given within a 15-minute period, with no more than 1 reminder needed per week.
  • By the end of the school year, the student will improve their self-monitoring skills by checking their work for errors and making appropriate revisions before turning it in, with no more than 2 reminders needed per week.
  • By the end of the trimester, the student will demonstrate improved attention and focus by remaining on-task for at least 15 minutes during independent work time, with no more than 2 reminders needed per week.
  • By the end of the school year, the student will improve their decision-making skills by accurately identifying at least 4 solutions to a problem presented in class and choosing the most appropriate solution, with no more than 1 reminder needed per week.

Example Executive Functioning IEP Goals for High School Students

  • By the end of the school year, the student will demonstrate improved organization skills by independently creating and maintaining a daily and weekly schedule with at least 5 tasks to complete per day and 10 tasks per week, with no more than 1 reminder needed per week.
  • By the end of the school year, the student  will improve their ability to follow multi-step directions by accurately completing classroom tasks requiring at least 6 steps, with no more than 1 reminder needed per week.
  • By the end of the school year, the student will demonstrate improved working memory skills by recalling and following through on at least 5 multi-step directions given within a 20-minute period, with no more than 1 reminder needed per week.
  • By the end of the school year, the student will demonstrate improved attention and focus by remaining on-task for at least 20 minutes during independent work time, with no more than 1 reminder needed per week.
  • By the end of the school year, the student will improve their decision-making skills by accurately identifying at least 5 solutions to a problem presented in class and choosing the most appropriate solution, with no more than 1 reminder needed per week.
  • By the end of the school year, the student will demonstrate improved emotional regulation skills by using at least 4 appropriate coping strategies when feeling frustrated or upset in class, with no more than 1 reminder needed per week.  

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Home » Blog » General » Effective IEP Goals for High School Students: Enhancing Problem-Solving Skills

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Effective IEP Goals for High School Students: Enhancing Problem-Solving Skills

Effective IEP Goals for High School Students: Enhancing Problem-Solving Skills

Special education professionals understand the importance of equipping students with the skills necessary to navigate their academic and social lives. One such critical skill is problem-solving, which plays a significant role in a student’s learning, social interactions, and overall wellbeing.

Understanding Problem-Solving Skills in High School Students

Problem-solving skills refer to a student’s ability to identify an issue, evaluate possible solutions, and take appropriate action to resolve the problem. These skills impact a student’s academic performance, interpersonal relationships, and emotional wellbeing. Developing strong problem-solving skills can help students overcome challenges and build resilience.

The Role of Specialists in Developing Problem-Solving Skills

Different specialists in the school setting can support the development of problem-solving skills in high school students:

  • Speech-Language Pathologists: These professionals can help students develop effective communication skills, which are crucial for expressing concerns and asking for help.
  • Social Workers: By providing emotional support and teaching coping strategies, social workers can enable students to manage stress and navigate challenging situations effectively.
  • Psychologists: School psychologists can assess students’ cognitive and emotional strengths and weaknesses, helping them develop tailored strategies for problem-solving.
  • School Counselors: These specialists can guide students in setting realistic goals, making informed decisions, and developing essential life skills.

IEP Goals for Enhancing Problem-Solving Skills

Here are some specific SMART IEP goals to improve problem-solving skills in high school students:

  • Strategies and Activities: Role-play scenarios, social stories, and guided practice with peers.
  • Strategies and Activities: Brainstorming sessions, problem-solving worksheets, and group discussions.
  • Strategies and Activities: Mindfulness exercises, emotion identification activities, and self-regulation techniques.

Implementing and Measuring Progress

To effectively implement these IEP goals and measure progress, try the following tips:

  • Collaborate with specialists to create a comprehensive support plan.
  • Monitor and document the student’s progress regularly.
  • Adjust strategies and activities based on the student’s needs and progress.
  • Involve the student in the goal-setting and evaluation process.
  • Communicate with parents and caregivers to reinforce skills at home.

Developing problem-solving skills in high school students is crucial for their academic, social, and emotional success. By setting appropriate IEP goals and collaborating with specialists, educators can help students overcome challenges and build resilience. Remember to monitor progress and adjust strategies as needed to ensure continued growth.

Feel free to share your experiences and ideas in the comments below. We encourage you to explore more resources and support at Everyday Speech Sample Materials .

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Self Regulation IEP Goals

Self regulation is a critical life skill that many students struggle to achieve. Individuals with poor self regulation skills can find it difficult to complete independent tasks, focus in class, and manage their emotions. If your student has difficulty with self regulation, consider adding a self regulation IEP goals related to this skill. There are many strategies that can help students improve their self regulation skills, and setting specific goals can help ensure that your child makes progress.

problem solving skills iep goals

Self-regulation is important for all students, but especially those with an IEP. Teaching your child how to regulate their emotions and behavior can help them succeed in school and life. Learn more about what self-regulation is, why it’s important, and how you can help your child achieve their IEP goals related to self-regulation.

What is a Self-Regulation Goal?

A self-regulation IEP goal is a measurable objective that focuses on helping your student or child learn how to regulate their emotions and behavior. Self regulation skills are important for all students, but they can be especially difficult for children with disabilities like ADHD, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), or emotional disturbance (ED). There are many strategies and techniques you can use to help your child improve their self regulation skills and complete tasks.

Self-regulation is an especially important IEP goal for students with ADHD or ASD, and it’s often included in the target goals of other disabilities. Students with poor regulation skills can have difficulty completing class work, making good choices, interacting with peers, and managing their emotions. If your child struggles with self regulation, it can have a negative impact on their education and social development.

The Importance of Self-Regulation IEP Goals

As stated, self-regulation is an especially important skill for students with disabilities that affect executive functions like ADHD or ASD. Executive functions are important mental skills that help your child manage their attention, memory, language comprehension, and problem solving skills. Some of the most important executive functions are inhibition, working memory, planning, and cognitive flexibility (the ability to switch between tasks).

Self-regulation is closely related to these mental processes. It’s essentially about controlling your body’s actions (inhibition), holding information in your mind (working memory), thinking strategically (planning), and switching between tasks (cognitive flexibility). Unfortunately, many students struggle with these skills.

If your child has difficulties with self-regulation, it can affect their performance in school and their social skills. By setting goals to improve self-regulation , you can help them achieve success and work toward a brighter future.

Why Self Regulation is Important for Students with ADD/ADHD

Many students with ADHD have issues regulating their behavior, which can make it difficult to focus in class or complete tasks. Typical interventions that help children with ADHD focus are often the opposite of what the child needs to regulate themselves. For example, if your child is acting out because they’re hyper, trying to decrease their energy will probably make things worse.

Instead, you must establish a treatment approach that helps your students to make the correct judgments about their actions. For example, one self-regulation IEP goal could help your child understand what kinds of tasks are appropriate for certain settings. If they’re an active student, it’s important to keep them moving during class, but they should probably sit down during a test.

Self Regulation Triggers and Calming Tools

Self Regulation Triggers and Calming Tools

Setting up appropriate goals for self regulation.

You can set any self-regulation IEP goal, but it’s important to consider your child’s specific needs. There are several areas you might focus on including time management skills, ability to transition between tasks, understanding the effects of different behaviors, or self-management skills.

Setting up a goal to improve time management skills is important for students so they know how long it will take them to complete certain tasks.

Making transitions between different tasks is another important area that’s included in many IEPs. This includes emotional and self regulation skills when going from the playground to the classroom, or making a transition from math to science class.

Understanding how different behaviors affect other people is also a key self-regulation skill. If your child struggles with this area, it can have a negative impact on their education and social development. For example, if your child hits their peers when they’re angry, it would be beneficial to help them learn to self-calm or ask for help.

Self-monitoring is another important skill that many students with disabilities need help with. If your child isn’t able to determine whether they’re acting appropriately, it can make it impossible for them to complete tasks successfully.

Self-monitoring skills can also help your child understand how their behavior might affect other people. Using self-monitoring checklists is an excellent strategy to help students who struggle in this area.

Self-Assessments and Checklists for Good Work Habits

Self-Assessments and Checklists for Good Work Habits

Becoming aware of behaviors that interfere with self regulation.

One key component of self-regulation is being aware of the reactions and thoughts of others, which includes taking turns during a conversation, understanding body language, learning appropriate coping strategies, and identifying social cues.

The first step to helping a child with self-regulation is to identify behaviors that interfere with their ability to work and play well with others on a daily basis. If your child has a difficult time completing a task because they can’t sit still, or getting through the school day without having a major meltdown, those are some good indicators that your child needs help with self-regulation.

Self Awareness and Judgments

It’s also important to teach students about their own thoughts and feelings, which is closely tied to self-awareness and emotional regulation. Kids learn to understand what kinds of judgments they might make about themselves or others based on different behaviors.

Emotional Intelligence Activities for Teens

Emotional Intelligence Activities for Teens

Working on self-regulation skills over time.

One of the difficulties of working on self-regulation is that it takes a lot of time and practice. If your child isn’t able to regulate their own behavior, over the course of the school year they need to learn new skills that help them understand how to interact with other people.

Each child learns at a different pace, so you might need to work with your student or child more or less depending on their abilities. Don’t be discouraged if they don’t learn new skills right away. It can take several weeks before they feel comfortable trying self-regulation in different environments.

Self Regulation is an Important Skill for Everyone

If you have a child with self-regulation difficulties, it can be challenging to meet their needs at school or in the community. For example, one important things for people on the autism spectrum is learning how to socialize and interact successfully with other people. Self regulation skills are an important part of that process. It’s never too late to start making changes that will help your child. Special education teachers, school psychologists, occupational therapists, and other school staff can help students reach new goals whether physical. social-emotional goals or academic goals.

Self Regulation is a key skill for everyone, and teaching it can be challenging at times, but some students may need extra assistance to make sure they learn how to self regulate in all areas. Read more on self regulation examples here.

Emotional Regulation Activities for Kids - Yoga Bundle

Emotional Regulation Activities for Kids – Yoga Bundle

How do you write self regulation iep goals.

Self-regulation refers to appropriate behavior related to any activity. For example, if a student is able to sit appropriately at their desk during broadened learning activities for 20 minutes without needing reminders or prompts from the teacher, this would be an appropriate self-regulatory behavior.

Self-regulation IEP goals provide measurable evidence of what your child needs to show they have mastered. In this case for data collection, the goal would be to have your child sit for 20 minutes at a time without needing reminders from his teacher during broadened learning activities.

It is important that self-regulation goals are age appropriate and tailored to fit your child’s individual needs. Desired levels of performance will vary depending on the student’s abilities, specific disabilities, classroom setting, teacher support, and academic grade levels.

Sometimes students with disabilities do not meet self-regulation IEP goals because they need special accommodations or modifications in order to succeed. For example, your child might only be able to work on writing assignments for 5 minutes before needing a movement break due to sensory processing issues. If the goal is set too high, the child will not be able to meet it by themselves. The movement break would be a special accommodation for that student.

Write Specific, Positive, Self Regulation Goals

A self-regulation IEP goal should be specific and positive so that it is clear what behaviors your child needs to show more of, rather than less of. A common mistake when writing self-regulation goals is focusing on the undesired behavior instead of desired behavior. For example, “Sam will not be loud when playing in the block center for 10 minutes” is not a positive, specific, self-regulation goal because it does not specify what behaviors Sam needs to show more of. A better way to write this goal would be “Sam will independently work in the block center for 10 minutes without needing any prompts from his teacher.”

Be sure to take the time to determine the student’s present level of performance when it comes to self regulation skills. Are weaknesses present such as impulsive behavior or decreased self-regulation skills during stressful situations? Best practice includes data collection to determine these areas of weakness.

Self-regulation may be difficult for some children to practice in the classroom due to factors such as distractions if there is too much going on, or when everyone else in the class is misbehaving. Self-regulation IEP goals will include how your child would respond when faced with these types of situations. For example: “When his teacher is busy attending to the whole class, Tom will continue working independently in his workbook for 5 minutes without needing any prompts from her.”

The next step when writing self-regulation IEP goals is choosing the appropriate levels of performance. Levels of performance refer to how well your child must perform in order to succeed at that goal. This includes talking about what your child can already do, what they have difficulty doing and what they will be able to do at the end of the goal.

Finally, it’s important to think about your child’s progress towards meeting self-regulation goals on a regular basis. If your child is not meeting their goals or regressing in their ability to meet them, you should consider different ways to meet the goal or consult your doctor or school team to create more appropriate goals for their needs.

How to Write IEP Goals Workbook

How to Write IEP Goals Workbook

Examples of smart self regulation iep goals.

SMART self regulation IEP goals are specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and timely. Keep in mind ALL goals should be individualized for each student. It is also important to write functional goals for the annual goal. Here are some examples of SMART goals to help spark ideas for your students:

  • Tommy will independently play in the block center for 15 minutes without needing any adult prompts.
  • Sarah will sit down during guided reading time instead of getting up and walking around her chair 4 times per session.
  • Billy will increase his number of appropriate behavior choices by going to a calm-down spot or using deep breathing exercises at least 3 times per session after he becomes frustrated.
  • Jim will stay on task for 5 minutes for an assignment before choosing preferred tasks 80% of the time.
  • Without teacher prompts, Maggie will stay seated and appropriately play with the musical instrument for 5 minutes without needing to take a break.
  • At circle time, Rebecca will wait for her turn to hold the stuffed animal instead of reaching across the table during several rotations per session.
  • Jackson will choose to re-join his classmates in a small group setting within 5 seconds after being redirected 2 times per session.
  • Once Jamie finishes his daily assignment, he will independently clean up his materials without prompting from his teacher.
  • At recess, Dawn will engage in 1 whole minute of play time with peers before moving onto other students’ games.
  • Rosa will increase her time on task by independently completing 1 page in the workbook during quiet reading time per session.
  • Heath will use positive self-talk to independently complete small but difficult tasks in science class.
  • Nathan will decrease his off-task behavior by staying seated and working quietly at least 80% of the time during small group instruction.
  • During recess, Tyler will independently join 1 or more students with whom he will play for at least 3 minutes without needing any prompts from his teacher.
  • Lily will maintain appropriate personal space from her peers during physical education class without a verbal cue from adults or peers 80% of the time.

Need More Help with IEP Goal Writing?

We all want our children to succeed in school and throughout their lives. One way for students to continue on the path of success is by developing self-regulation skills, which are crucial in every aspect of life. Self regulation IEP goals can help your child develop these important skills at home and in school so they can feel confident about any challenge that comes their way!

If you’re interested in learning more about how to create SMART IEP goals for your student or need some ideas to get started, check out this workbook – How to Write SMART IEP Goals. This helpful resource will walk you through each step of the process with easy tips along the way!

More Helpful Resources

Executive Functioning IEP Goals

SMART Goals – Examples for Students

Daily Living Skills – Goals and Objectives

Anxiety IEP Goals

Self Regulation Strategies

Read more about the  strengths and weaknesses for the IEP here.

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7 Cognitive Flexibility IEP Goals for Real Life

Written by:

  Rebekah Pierce

Filed under: IEPs , Cognitive Flexibility , Executive Functioning

READING TIME:  ~ minutes

If the COVID-19 pandemic showed us anything, it was that it’s important to be flexible. This period of time turned life upside down for everyone – but especially for parents and their children.

There’s no set definition for flexibility as it relates to executive functioning skills – as such, you might say the definition itself is “flexible!”

However, it is generally considered the ability to switch between tasks and attitudes in order to respond to changes in the environment around us.

Children with unique learning needs like autism spectrum disorder often struggle with remaining flexible in the face of change – however, it’s not just kids with unique learning needs who need help mastering these skills. We could all benefit from being a bit more flexible from time to time!

If you’re working on writing or working toward IEP goals in flexibility for the child you work with, these tips should help you do so.

What is Cognitive Flexibility?

When we think about flexibility, many have a tendency to think about gymnasts on the balance bar.

Yes, that is a measurement of flexibility – but when it comes to life skills, mental flexibility is more important than what gymnasts have (physical flexibility).

Flexibility is the ability to switch between various demands and tasks to respond to changes around us. You might hear the term “task switching” used to refer to mental flexibility, too. In any event, it all means the same thing – if you are flexible, you can adapt quickly and respond to change with minimal stress.

If you struggle with flexibility, you might have a hard time differentiating between differences in the environment. It might be challenging for you to transition between activities or identify relevant information.

Flexibility is important because it helps improve our reading abilities, our ability to be creative, our capacity to respond to negative life events, and more.

Some signs that your child needs to work on building flexibility include:

  • Getting frustrated over minor inconveniences
  • Repeating the same mistake or ineffective action again and again
  • Expressing frustration or negative behaviors when transitioning between activities or when there is a change in routine
  • Having trouble leaving activities

Have you ever heard this saying, “the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again – and expecting the same results?”

It’s not necessarily the definition of insanity -rather, this is the definition of inflexibility. If you’re flexible, you’ll try something new when the first action or response was not effective.

Sample IEP Goals for Flexibility

If you’re trying to help your child learn how to deal with the unexpected, here are some sample IEP goals for flexibility you might want to try out.

Adaptive Goals

  • By the end of the school year, the student will follow directives from a teacher or other adult when classroom plans change without engaging in problem behaviors, 100% of the time in 4 out of 5 trials, based on teacher observation.
  • By the end of the IEP term, the student will transition from one activity to another with one verbal prompt, 90% of the time, based on teacher observation.

Social Goals

  • By the end of the school year, the student will adjust his behavior to the requirements of different social situations (e.g. changes in expectations and rules), given one verbal prompt, 90% of the time, based on teacher observation.
  • By the end of the IEP term, the student will respond in a positive manner to conversations started by others, 100% of the time, based on student observation.

Reading Goals

  • By the end of the school year, when given a passage at the proper grade level, the student will make inferences from information provided in the passage and identify how those inferences changed at the end of the passage, with 90% accuracy in four out of five trials, based on teacher observation.
  • By the end of the school year, when a word problem cannot be solved by the first technique chosen, the student will choose a second technique to try, 90% of the time, according to teacher observation.

Writing Goals

  • By the end of the school year, the student will use a thesaurus when writing 100% of the time to substitute new words for more common ones in his writing, based on teacher observation.

Tips on Addressing Goals for Flexibility

Here are a few ways to help your child understand the importance of staying flexible in an ever-changing world.

Talk About the Big Picture

When working with your child on flexibility goals, take the time to sit down and talk about the big picture.

Why is it important to be flexible? What are some common situations that come up that require you to be flexible? How many of these are big deals, in the grand scheme of things, versus not big deals?

Help your learner understand tolerance and flexibility. Sometimes change is good! You can use social stories or even flexible thinking flashcards (you’ll find some excellent examples in the Real Life Executive Functioning Workbook !) to help you do this.

For many students with unique learning needs, it can be helpful to come up with a list of strategies that can be used when there’s a need for greater flexibility.

Write down a list of strategies – the flexibility flowchart in the Real Life Executive Functioning Workbook (coupon code LSA20 for 20% off at checkout) has some helpful examples! – that your child can use when the need strikes.

Play Games and Do Puzzles

One of the best ways to improve your child’s flexibility is to have a little fun – play some games!

Playing strategy games or doing puzzles (even simple jigsaw puzzles) is a great way to build flexibility. It will show them that there are multiple solutions to every problem – and that trying multiple solutions is often a good way to be successful.

Work With a Partner

It can be tough to see something from someone else’s point of view – especially if you struggle with flexibility.

Consider using the Try My Way activity in the Real Life Executive Functioning Workbook to give your learner a fresh take on their old perspectives – or have them team up with a partner to discuss multiple approaches to common problems.

Integrate Opportunities Everywhere

One of the best ways to teach new life skills to students is to make sure that they are integrated into every walk of life. Take the time to practice unpredictability in the daily routine so that your child can handle disruptions no matter what setting they take place in. You’ll find some fun practice techniques in the “Messed Up Morning” activity within the Real Life Executive Functioning Workbook.

Something else that can be helpful is to work on transitions. So many students get hung up on transitioning between activities that it can completely derail them. Practice transitions between common activities – such as changing classes at school – so that these become second nature.

How to Address Each Goal

Not sure where to start? The best way to start working on flexibility goals is to figure out what exactly is causing the problem.

Does your child struggle with common situations that require flexibility? Does he need to learn new flexibility skills when faced with a challenge? Or does he just need to build a tolerance to unpredictability?

The Real Life Executive Functioning Skills Assessment is a great place to start. It will tell you all about the skills, weaknesses, and focus areas that you need to target in your student. It will give you a clear idea of what you need to focus on so that you can write goals that are clear and specific. This assessment is a helpful tool both for students and the adults that work with them, like teachers, parents, and paraprofessionals.

How to Be Flexible When Writing IEP Goals

If you’re writing IEP goals for flexibility, the most important thing to remember is that you need to be flexible yourself! Don’t be afraid to revise and revisit goals as needed to make sure they accurately reflect the needs of the child you’re working with.

Start by having your child take the Real Life Executive Functioning Skills Assessment . This will give you a clear idea of what sorts of goals to work with from the very beginning. While there’s nothing wrong with taking new approaches later on, this assessment will give you a great idea of where to start.

Be patient, be creative, and most importantly – be flexible. You and your learner are sure to be successful!

Looking For More Executive Functioning IEP Goal Ideas?

Visit our EF IEP Goal Resource Hub or check out our other skill-specific IEP goal articles:

  • 8 Impulse Control IEP Goals
  • 8 Attentional Control IEP Goals
  • 8 Self-Monitoring IEP Goals
  • 10 Problem Solving IEP Goals
  • 10 Working Memory IEP Goals
  • 9 Emotional Control IEP Goals
  • 7 Cognitive Flexibility IEP Goals
  • 10 Organization IEP Goals
  • 12 Task Initiation IEP Goals
  • 10 Time Management IEP Goals
  • 15 Planning IEP Goals

Further Reading

  • Amy Sippl: Executive Functioning Skills 101: Flexibility
  • Rebekah Pierce: Social Stories for Adolescents and Young Adults
  • Rebekah Pierce: How to Deal With Changes to a Routine
  • Amy Sippl: 7 Cognitive Flexibility Strategies To Support Your Adolescent

Neurodivergent-Friendly Tools & Resources

Check our full reader and client-curated selection of neurodivergent-friendly tools & resources .

Real-Life Executive Functioning Cookbook

Cooking is freakin’ hard. EF challenges don’t help. Learn more about our neurodivergent-friendly cookbook and start feeling more confident in the kitchen.

Real-Life Executive Functioning Cookbook

Use coupon code LSA20 for 20% off.

IEP Meetings (Online Course by Rise Educational Advocacy)

On-demand IEP training at your fingertips. Understand IEPs, communicate effectively with teams, and feel confident at every meeting.

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Experience active listening without the distraction of note-taking. With Fathom , a free AI tool for individuals, your Zoom meetings are effortlessly recorded and transcribed. No more frantic note scribbles.

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About The Author

Rebekah pierce.

Rebekah is a New York writer and teacher who specializes in writing in the education, gardening, health, and natural food niches. In addition to teaching and writing, she also owns a farm and is the author of the blog J&R Pierce Family Farm .

Related Posts

6 steps to help your child develop a strong “why” when goal setting, sleep & executive functioning: boost your cognitive skills through quality rest, coaching vs. therapy which one do i need, every parent’s guide to decision fatigue (part 1), how to use the eisenhower matrix to help your teen plan their day, stop, think, act: how to practice emotional control skills with your teen.

Life Skills Advocate is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. Some of the links in this post may be Amazon.com affiliate links, which means if you make a purchase, Life Skills Advocate will earn a commission. However, we only promote products we actually use or those which have been vetted by the greater community of families and professionals who support individuals with diverse learning needs.

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problem solving skills iep goals

100+ Social-Emotional Skills IEP Goals [The Complete List]

The goal of social-emotional learning is for students to develop five core competencies :

  • Self-Awareness
  • Social Awareness
  • Self-Management
  • Relationship Skills
  • Responsible Decision-Making

When equipped with these competencies, children are better prepared to socialize productively and manage their emotions . Social-emotional skills carry through into adulthood, which is why it's so important for educators to teach them from a young age.

Trauma, anxiety, and behavioral disorders can impact a child's mental health in profoundly adverse ways, more so if that child lacks one or more SEL competencies.

Some children need more time to develop social-emotional skills than others. It’s essential that you create a learning plan for these students to track their progress. Incorporating SEL goals into a behavioral IEP lets you focus your attention on a student’s most pressing needs.

Here is a list of over 100 social-emotional IEP goals curated by our experts at Positive Action to get you started.

Self-Awareness/Emotional Regulation

Goal: ________ will identify and manage feelings (i.e., anger, anxiety, stress, frustration) on a daily basis with ________ frequency as measured by ________ .

Objectives:

  • Relate situations in which one experiences a given emotion.
  • Say NO to an inappropriate request.
  • Accept NO for an answer.
  • Recognize signs of frustration.
  • Manage unreasonable fears.
  • Identify appropriate ways to convey emotions like pleasure and anger.
  • Practice ways to reduce anxiety and stress in real and simulated situations.

Goal: ________ will identify and express feelings/strengths about self and others with ________ frequency, (independent of teacher prompts and redirections) as measured by ________.

  • Make positive statements about one’s qualities and achievements.
  • Identify one’s areas of improvement.
  • Name things one likes and dislikes about oneself .
  • Show understanding of another's feelings.
  • Identify other people’s accomplishments.

Goal: ________ will identify his level of anxiety and use a strategy to reduce his anxiety 50% of the time.

  • Identify the level of his anxiety.
  • Select an appropriate strategy to alleviate anxiety.
  • Practice a strategy to reduce anxiety.
  • Problem-Solving Skills

Goal: ________ will make appropriate decisions on a daily basis with ________ frequency as measured by ________ (teacher observation, checklist, anecdotal records, behavior checklist, self-evaluation, etc.).

  • Collect necessary information to make decisions.
  • Identify options available in making a decision.
  • Determine which decisions can be made individually and which would require support from others.
  • Identify the short- and long-term impact of various decisions.
  • Choose solutions that best meet one’s needs.
  • Arrange problems by importance.
  • Follow through with a plan or modify the plan to meet goals.
  • Voluntarily accept responsibility for one’s own behavior without making excuses.
  • Say NO to unreasonable requests.

Alternatives to Conflict

Goal: ________ will manage conflicts on a daily basis with ________ frequency, independent of teacher support, with teacher support as measured by ________ (teacher observation, checklist, anecdotal records, behavior checklist, self evaluation, etc.).

  • Distinguish which behaviors and language are acceptable and unacceptable.
  • Identify situations that may lead to conflict.
  • Constructively handle situations that may lead to conflict.
  • Ask for assistance to resolve a conflict after an independent attempt.
  • Appropriately state angry feelings to the person involved.
  • Control one’s temper in conflict situations.
  • Respond appropriately to peer pressure.
  • School/Classroom Skills

Goal: ________ will control impulsive behavior with ________ frequency as measured by ________.

  • Demonstrate difference between impulsive and self-controlled behavior.
  • Practice self-controlled behaviors in real or simulated situations.
  • Identify potential consequences of impulsive behavior in real and simulated situations.

Goal: ________ will remain on task and work independently with ________ frequency as measured by ________.

  • Ignore distractions while completing independent work.
  • Work steadily with attention focused on the task.
  • Stay on task when adults enter or leave the classroom.
  • Independently begin tasks from a prearranged schedule.
  • Attempt to independently resolve problems with an assignment before asking for help.

Goal: ________ will follow directions given by teacher or staff or other adults with ________ frequency as measured by ________.

  • Follow the verbal direction in a timely manner.
  • Read and follow written directions in a timely manner and with cooperation.
  • Comply with timeout requests near or at own desk.
  • Comply with teacher requests within reasonable time span.
  • Follow classroom rules when lead teacher is not present.
  • Recognize inability to understand directions and seek clarification or assistance before proceeding with task.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of class rules by complying with rules during class time.

Goal: ________ will display productive school behavior on a daily basis with ________ frequency as measured by ________.

  • Attend school consistently.
  • Attend all scheduled appointments regularly and promptly.
  • Complete assigned work on a daily basis.
  • Attempt tasks that may be considered challenging and be willing to take a risk with new material.
  • Accept correction appropriately.
  • Adapt effectively to change (e.g. assemblies, fire drills, schedule changes, seat assignments, new students or exiting students).
  • Ask for help when needed.
  • Volunteer an answer to the teachers question in a voice tone, volume and physical manner appropriate to the situation.
  • Use appropriate language.
  • Identify and follow rules in the lunchroom, bathroom, halls, and bus.

Goal: ________ will engage in appropriate group activity (play, academics, classroom discussion, etc.) with ________ frequency as measured by ________.

  • Use appropriate phrases (such as "please” and “thank you").
  • Lead or present to group (e.g., present oral reports, initiate group activity).
  • Participate in a discussion led by the teacher by listening, raising hand, and waiting to be recognized.
  • Wait quietly and respectfully while others are speaking.
  • Ask permission if wanting to give or receive physical contact (ex. hug).

Goal: ________ will respect property of others and school property according to classroom and/or school rules with ________ frequency as measured by ________.

  • Ask permission to use another's property.
  • Demonstrate correct use of classroom equipment and materials.
  • Use and return borrowed items to the owner in original condition.
  • Distinguish someone else's property from one’s own.
  • Return all equipment to the proper storage place.
  • Transportation and Public Conduct

Goal: ________ will use appropriate behaviors while riding a vehicle (ex., bus) with ________ frequency as measured by ________.

  • Remain in seat with the seat belt fastened while the bus is in motion.
  • Keep hands and feet to self and inside the vehicle.
  • Speak in appropriate language, volume, tone or voice.
  • Respect rights and property of others on the bus.
  • Comply with the bus driver's directions.
  • Social/Interpersonal Skills

Goal: ________ will increase conversation skills to stick to the topic at hand.

Objectives: Identify what happened first, in the middle, and last regarding a previously read story, past event, or situation.

State the main idea of the story, video, or situation 4/5 opportunities to do so.

Goal: ________ will develop social understanding skills as measured by the benchmarks listed below.

Objectives: Engage in appropriate turn-taking skills by attending to peer’s turn and waiting for one’s own turn 4/5 opportunities to do so.

Work cooperatively with peers in small group settings (ex., share materials, allow peers to share different thoughts) 4/5 opportunities to do so.

Raise their hand and wait to be called on before talking aloud in group settings 4/5 opportunities to do so.

Goal: ________ will increase social-emotional skills as measured by the benchmarks listed below.

Objectives: Identify various simple emotional states in self 4/5 opportunities to do so.

State what would be an appropriate response to a particular emotional state 4/5 opportunities to do so.

State why a person might be feeling a particular emotion 4/5 opportunities to do so.

Goal: ________ will demonstrate appropriate play skills, peer relations, cooperative learning and assertiveness with ________ (frequency) as measured by ________.

  • Learn and follow the rules when playing an organized game.
  • Engage in cooperative play with at least one other peer.
  • Display effort in a competitive game situation.
  • Use assertive behavior in resisting harmful peer pressure.
  • Take appropriate action in supporting a person whose rights are being violated.
  • Refrain from interrupting others in conversation.
  • Wait his/her turn in games or activities.
  • Appropriately express feelings when wronged.
  • Identify aggressive, assertive, and passive behaviors and styles.
  • Accept responsibility for changing own behaviors.
  • Practice assertiveness skills in real and simulated situations.
  • Engage in appropriate behavior when confronted with inappropriate behavior.
  • Handle defeat in a competitive game situation by congratulating the winner without grumbling or engaging in other negative behaviors.
  • Identify appropriate behavior when presented with real or simulated situations involving peer pressure.

Other Sample IEP Goals without Objectives

Social skills/life skills/emotional regulation.

During unstructured play times, ________ will interact with peers in an appropriate manner by maintaining personal space and a respectful voice for an average 80% of intervals, measured over a two-week period.

When given scenarios of social conflicts, ________ will demonstrate problem-solving skills by identifying the problem and generating two solutions appropriate to the situation in 4/5 trials, as measured by data collection.

During recess, ________ will initiate and begin a back-and-forth conversation exchange (for example, greeting and asking about a shared interest, such as a TV show, or asking if the peer enjoys crafts/art) with one of the previously identified classmates independently with 80% success across 3 consecutive weeks.

________ will acquire two new social skills per quarter to a level of ________ % accuracy including initiating conversations with peers and adults, participating in turn-taking during structured activities and recognizing positive social interactions.

Given direct instruction and visual supports, ________ will obtain two new life skills per quarter, including bathroom and hygiene routines. He/She will perform the skill independently to a level of 70% accuracy.

________ will increase his/her social communication skills by refining four skills including requesting help and using pictures or words in order to have basic needs met 3 out of 5 opportunities to do so.

________ will increase his independent work time by completing one task with one or fewer adult prompts 3 out of 5 opportunities to do so.

________ will demonstrate the accurate use and understanding of statements and questions by increasing the accurate use of these sentence forms 4 out of 5 opportunities to do so.

In the classroom environment, ________ will utilize positive self-talk and coping strategies to handle stressful situations or work demands in which he/she manifests anxious or withdrawn behavior (i.e. putting head down, saying he/she can't do something), demonstrated by engaging in the 30-minute activity or situation in a calm and positive manner with one prompt on 2/3 occasions.

When ________ becomes upset, frustrated, or angry, he will use a self-regulation/coping strategy (movement break, deep breathing, quiet space break, deep pressure/heavy work activity, etc.) to avoid engaging in unexpected behavior, with one reminder, on 4 out of 5 opportunities, as measured by observations and documentation.

When given a frustrating situation (i.e. undesired task, demand, and/or undesired peer behavior), with one prompt ________ will utilize coping strategies (i.e. take a break, deep breaths, etc.) and return to and remain on task with a calm body and mind for a minimum of 10 minutes with an average of 95% over 8 consecutive school weeks, across all classroom environments.

________ will refrain from physical aggression (i.e. kicking, hitting, pushing, tripping) across all environments in school, for 4 consecutive weeks, with all adults and children as measured by event data.

Through the use of Self-Monitoring checklists, ________ will reduce instances of passive non-compliance (becomes purposely and increasingly distracted through ignoring tasks, demands, or staff directives) to an average of 20% of intervals or less, both across all educational environments and within each educational environment, as measured across a one week period.

________ will demonstrate the ability to recognize expected and unexpected behaviors as well as rate his own behavior as part of his self-monitoring system with 80% accuracy as compared to teacher ratings of behavior.

________ will allow themselves to be mad or frustrated without hurting 90% of observed opportunities.

If you believe that SEL will benefit your students , talk to your fellow teachers and your school’s leadership about adopting Positive Action as part of your social-skills program .

If you’d like to learn more about how Positive Action program can help your school or district contact us here .

References:

IEP Goals and Objectives Bank (Redmond, Oregon). Retrieved from here .

National Association of Special Education Teachers. Examples of IEP Goals and Objectives: Suggestions for Students with Autism. Retrieved from here .

Rhode Island Department of Education. Examples of IEP Goals for Social and Emotional Skills and Learning. Retrieved from here .

Smithey, Ashley. IEP Goal Bank. Retrieved from here .

Social Emotional Goals. Retrieved from here .

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Speech Therapy Store

432+ Free Measurable IEP Goals and Objectives Bank

If you want to save yourself time writing your IEP’s you’ve come to the right place. Here is a 432+ free IEP goal bank to make your life easier writing your speech therapy goals and to save you time.

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IEP Goal Bank for Speech Therapy Goals

Articulation, functional life skills, expressive language, receptive language, auditory discrimination, phonological awareness, social skills/pragmatics.

  • Augmentative Alternative Communication (AAC)

Figurative Language

Written language, intelligibility, speech therapy goals for articulation.

Given 20 sounds and a verbal prompt or model , STUDENT will articulate the sound(s) of / / at the isolation level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given 20 sounds, STUDENT will independently  articulate the sound(s) of / / at the isolation level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given 20 words or pictures and a verbal prompt or model , STUDENT will articulate the sound(s) of / / at the syllable level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given 20 words or pictures, STUDENT will independently  articulate the sound(s) of / / at the syllable level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given 20 words or pictures and a verbal prompt or model , STUDENT will articulate the sound(s) of / / in all positions of words at the word level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given 20 words or pictures, STUDENT will independently articulate the sound(s) of / / in all positions of words at the word level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given 20 words or pictures and a verbal prompt or model , STUDENT will articulate the sound(s) of / / in all positions of words at the phrase level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.  

Given 20 words or pictures, STUDENT will independently articulate the sound(s) of / / in all positions of words at the phrase level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given 20 words or pictures and a verbal prompt or model , STUDENT will articulate the sound(s) of / / in all positions of words at the sentence level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.  

Given 20 words or pictures, STUDENT will independently articulate the sound(s) of / / in all positions of words at the sentence level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a reading passage, STUDENT will independently  articulate the sound(s) of / / in all positions of words at the reading level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a reading passage, STUDENT will independently retell the story by articulating the sound(s) of / / in all positions of words at the conversational level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a reading passage, STUDENT will independently  answer WH questions by articulating the sound(s) of / / in all positions of words at the conversational level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a conversational topic, STUDENT will independently articulate the sound(s) of / / in all positions of words at the conversational level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a conversational topic, STUDENT will self-monitor  articulation of the sound(s) of / / in all positions of words at the conversational level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a classroom discourse, STUDENT will generalize  articulation of the sound(s) of / / in all positions of words at the conversational level  outside of the therapy setting with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

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Speech therapy goals for phonology.

  • Substitution
  • Assimilation
  • Syllable Structure

-Substitution

Given a picture or object to describe, STUDENT will  produce age-appropriate bilabial  (i.e., /p, b, m/) and alveolar sounds  (i.e., /t, d, n)   in  words  to reduce the process of backing  at the word, phrase, or sentence level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or object to describe, STUDENT will  produce velar sounds (i.e., /k, g/)   in  words  to reduce the process of fronting  at the word, phrase, or sentence level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or object to describe, STUDENT will  produce age-appropriate consonants /r, l/ instead of /w, j/  in  words  to reduce the process of gliding  (i.e., “wabbit” for “rabbit”) at the word, phrase, or sentence level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or object to describe, STUDENT will  produce stop sounds (i.e., /t, p/)   in  words  to reduce the process of stopping  at the word, phrase, or sentence level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or object to describe, STUDENT will  produce the sounds /l, er/  in  words  to reduce the process of vowelization  at the word, phrase, or sentence level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or object to describe, STUDENT will  produce all age-appropriate phonemes in  words  to reduce the process of affrication  (i.e., using /ch or j/ for non-affricate “ jime ”  for “dime”) at the word, phrase, or sentence level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or object to describe, STUDENT will  produce the sounds /ch, j/  in  words  to reduce the process of deaffrication  (i.e., replacing /ch or j/ for fricative or stop “ships”  for “chips”) at the word, phrase, or sentence level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or object to describe, STUDENT will  produce the alveolar sounds   in  words (t, d, n)   to reduce the process of alveolarization  (i.e., using alveolar for non-alveolar “tan”  for “pan”) at the word, phrase, or sentence level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or object to describe, STUDENT will  produce the palatal sounds   in  words (sh, zh)   to reduce the process of depalatalization  (i.e., using non-palatal for palatal “fit”  for “fish”) at the word, phrase, or sentence level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or object to describe, STUDENT will  produce the labial sounds in  words (p, b)   to reduce the process of labialization  (i.e., using labial for non-labial “pie”  for “tie”) at the word, phrase, or sentence level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Assimilation

Given a picture or object to describe, STUDENT will  produce all age-appropriate phonemes  in  2-3 syllable words  to reduce the process of labial assimilation   (i.e., using labial /p, b, m,w/ for non-labial “ peb ” for “pen”) at the word, phrase, or sentence level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or object to describe, STUDENT will  produce all age-appropriate phonemes  in  2-3 syllable words  to reduce the process of velar assimilation   (i.e., using velar /k, g, ng/ for non-velar “kug” for “cup”) at the word, phrase, or sentence level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or object to describe, STUDENT will  produce all age-appropriate phonemes  in  2-3 syllable words  to reduce the process of nasal assimilation   (i.e., using nasal /m, n, ng/ for non-nasal “mom” for “mop”) at the word, phrase, or sentence level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or object to describe, STUDENT will  produce all age-appropriate phonemes  in  2-3 syllable words  to reduce the process of alveolar assimilation   (i.e., using alveolar /t, d, n, l, s, z/ for non-alveolar “tot” for “toss”) at the word, phrase, or sentence level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or object to describe, STUDENT will  produce the nasal sounds in  words (m, n)   to reduce the process of denasalization  (i.e., using non-nasal for nasal “doze”  for “nose”) at the word, phrase, or sentence level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or object to describe, STUDENT will  produce the final voiced consonants in  words (b, d)   to reduce the process of final consonant devoicing  (i.e., using voiceless final consonant for voiced final consonant “pick” for “pig”) at the word, phrase, or sentence level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or object to describe, STUDENT will  produce the correct phoneme in  words  to reduce the process of coalescence  (i.e., using two phonemes for one phoneme that has similar features “foon” for “spoon”) at the word, phrase, or sentence level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or object to describe, STUDENT will  produce all the phonemes  in  words  to reduce the process of reduplication  (i.e., when complete or incomplete syllable is repeated “baba” for “bottle”) at the word, phrase, or sentence level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Syllable Structure

Given a picture or object to describe, STUDENT will  produce all age-appropriate phonemes  in  2-3 syllable words  to reduce the process of cluster reduction  (i.e., “top” for “stop”) at the word, phrase, or sentence level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or object to describe, STUDENT will  produce age-appropriate consonants in the initial position of words  to reduce  initial consonant deletion  at the word, phrase, or sentence level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a picture or object to describe, STUDENT will  produce age-appropriate consonants in the  medial position of words  to reduce  medial consonant deletion  at the word, phrase, or sentence level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or object to describe, STUDENT will  produce age-appropriate consonants in the  final position of words  to reduce final consonant deletion  at the word, phrase, or sentence level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or object to describe, STUDENT will  produce all syllables in two-syllable and 3-syllable words  to reduce  weak syllable deletion  at the word, phrase, or sentence level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or object to describe, STUDENT will  produce only the phonemes in the word to reduce  epenthesis  (i.e., adding the “uh” sound between two consonants “bu- lue ” for “blue”) at the word, phrase, or sentence level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Speech Therapy Goals for Deaf / Hard of Hearing

Given a hearing amplification system, STUDENT will  wear it consistently  and transport the teacher unit to all classroom teachers  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a hearing amplification system, STUDENT will  recharge it daily  at  the end of the school day ready for the next school day  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a hearing amplification system, STUDENT will  advocate  with  Speech Therapist or classroom teacher  if there are any problems with the hearing amplification system with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given hearing aids, STUDENT will  clean and dry ear molds  using the appropriate materials (i.e., soap, pipe cleaners, towels) once a week  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given hearing aids, STUDENT will  detect a weak battery  and  change the battery  as needed with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Speech Therapy Goals for Stuttering

  • Desensitization
  • Stuttering Modifications Techniques
  • Fluency Shaping Techniques
  • Secondary Behaviors

-Desensitization

Given 15 sentences with “bumpy” or “smooth” speech, STUDENT will identify if the  clinician’s speech  is “bumpy” or “smooth” with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a 2 minute tape-recording of HIS/HER reading or conversational speech with “bumpy” or “smooth” speech, STUDENT will identify if HIS/HER speech is “bumpy” or “smooth” with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given 15 sentences with fast or slow speech, STUDENT will identify if the  clinician’s speech  is fast or slow with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.   

Given a 2 minute tape-recording of HIS/HER reading or conversational speech with fast or slow speech, STUDENT will identify if  HIS/HER speech  is fast or slow with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given 15 sentences with random disfluencies, STUDENT will identify the disfluencies in the clinician’s speech with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a 2 minute tape-recording of HIS/HER reading or conversational speech with random disfluencies, STUDENT will identify the disfluencies in  HIS/HER speech with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Stuttering Modifications Techniques

Given knowledge, examples, and information about stuttering modification techniques (cancellation, pull-out, preparatory set), STUDENT will name and describe each stuttering modification technique  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 20 words, STUDENT will use the cancellation method to minimize disfluencies at the  word level  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given 10 modeled sentences, STUDENT will use the cancellation method to repeat the sentences with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given 20 sentences, STUDENT will use the cancellation method to minimize disfluencies at the  sentence level  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a reading passage, STUDENT will use the cancellation method to minimize disfluencies during  reading  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a conversational topic, STUDENT will use the cancellation method to minimize disfluencies during  a conversation  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given 20 words, STUDENT will use the pull-out method to minimize disfluencies at the  word level  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given 10 modeled sentences, STUDENT will use the pull-out method to repeat the sentences with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given 20 sentences, STUDENT will use the pull-out method to minimize disfluencies at the  sentence level  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a reading passage, STUDENT will use the pull-out  method to minimize disfluencies during  reading  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.   

Given a conversational topic, STUDENT will use the pull-out  method to minimize disfluencies during  a conversation  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given 20 words, STUDENT will use the preparatory set method to minimize disfluencies at the  word level  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given 10 modeled sentences, STUDENT will use the preparatory set method to repeat the sentences with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given 20 sentences, STUDENT will use the preparatory set method to minimize disfluencies at the  sentence level  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a reading passage, STUDENT will use the preparatory set method to minimize disfluencies during  reading  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.   

Given a conversational topic, STUDENT will use the preparatory set method to minimize disfluencies during  a conversation  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

-Fluency Shaping Techniques

Given knowledge, examples, and information about fluency shaping techniques (easy onset, light articulatory contact, slow rate), STUDENT will name and describe each fluency shaping technique  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 20 words, STUDENT will use the easy onset technique  to minimize disfluencies at the  word level  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given 10 modeled sentences, STUDENT will use the easy onset technique  to repeat the sentences with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given 20 sentences, STUDENT will use the easy onset technique to minimize disfluencies at the  sentence level  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a reading passage, STUDENT will use the easy onset technique  to minimize disfluencies during  reading  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a conversational topic, STUDENT will use the easy onset technique  to minimize disfluencies during  a conversation  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given 20 words, STUDENT will use the light articulatory contact technique  to minimize disfluencies at the  word level  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given 10 modeled sentences, STUDENT will use the light articulatory contact technique  to repeat the sentences with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given 20 sentences, STUDENT will use the light articulatory contact technique  to minimize disfluencies at the  sentence level with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a reading passage, STUDENT will use the light articulatory contact technique  to minimize disfluencies during  reading  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a conversational topic, STUDENT will use the light articulatory contact technique  to minimize disfluencies during  a conversation  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given 20 words, STUDENT will use the slow rate technique  to minimize disfluencies at the  word level  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given 10 modeled sentences, STUDENT will use the slow rate technique  to repeat the sentences with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given 20 sentences, STUDENT will use the slow rate technique  to minimize disfluencies at the  sentence level  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a reading passage, STUDENT will use the slow rate technique  to minimize disfluencies during  reading  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a conversational topic, STUDENT will use the slow rate technique  to minimize disfluencies during  a conversation  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

-Secondary Behaviors

Given knowledge, examples, and video of oneself, STUDENT will identify and name  each of their  secondary behaviors  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a structured activity, STUDENT will identify and reduce  each of their  secondary behaviors  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a conversation, STUDENT will identify and reduce  each of their  secondary behaviors  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Speech Therapy Goals for Life Skills

  • Conversation
  • Social Skills

Given a functional symbol (cooking, community , safety, etc.), STUDENT will  match identical symbols  given a choice of 4 options wit 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a functional symbol (cooking, community , safety, etc.), STUDENT will  match symbols to actual objects  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a functional classroom symbol, STUDENT will demonstrate knowledge of the symbol by performing an action or going to the appropriate place when shown a symbo l  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a simple verbal directive (sit, stand, give, go), STUDENT will demonstrate knowledge of verbal directive by performing the action  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 10 pictures or objects for 2 different categories, STUDENT will identify the categories and  categorize the picture or objects  into 2 different categories  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an event or object, STUDENT will  describe the event or object using at least 3 descriptors  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an event or story, STUDENT will  retell the event or story  using appropriate  sequencing  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a social situation or role-play scenario, STUDENT will independently express HIS/HER  wants or needs , such as stop, help, want, need, thirsty, toilet, etc. using HIS/HER AAC device, a gesture, or a sign with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a visual or social situation, STUDENT will label the other person’s feelings and/or emotions based on their facial expressions and body language  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a yes/no question concerning social/community settings , STUDENT will correctly answer the yes/no question  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given two objects, STUDENT will identify the  similarities and differences between the objects  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or a short story, STUDENT will explain the meaning of the figurative language and idioms  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Conversation

Given a new person entering or leaving a situation, STUDENT will independently volunteer social greetings and farewells , such as “hi” and “bye” with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a social situation or role-play scenario, STUDENT will make a statement or ask a question to initiate a conversation with a familiar listener with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a social situation or role-play scenario, STUDENT will make a statement or ask a question to initiate a conversation with an unfamiliar listener with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a conversation, STUDENT will maintain appropriate eye contact when speaking to another person 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.  

Given a conversation, STUDENT will use an appropriate volume based on the social situation  they are in with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a conversation, STUDENT will make a statement or ask a question  to maintain the topic of conversation with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a conversation, STUDENT will take turns speaking to provide a give and take conversation  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.  

Given a conversation, STUDENT will ask 1 or 2 follow-up questions  to ensure the conversation is two-sided with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a conversation, STUDENT will demonstrate the ability to provide the appropriate amount of information  during a conversational exchange with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a conversation, STUDENT will use a statement to end the conversation appropriately with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.  

-Social Skills

Given a social situation or role-play scenario, STUDENT will maintain personal space at least an arm’s length distance between HIMSELF/HERSELF and others across all settings with no more than 1 verbal prompt  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a classroom discourse or conversation, STUDENT will actively listen to the speaker by facing the speaker, keeping mouth and body still, nodding head to show listening, asking questions and/or making on-topic comments  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a social situation or role-play scenario, STUDENT will solve a social problem  by identifying the problem, developing possible solutions, and choosing the best solution  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a social situation or role-play scenario, STUDENT will advocate for help  by appropriately  gaining the teacher’s attention, verbally asking for help, using clear and concise sentences  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a social situation or role-play scenario, STUDENT will accurately  identify another’s perspective  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a social situation or role-play scenario, STUDENT will protest using appropriate language  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a social situation or role-play scenario, STUDENT will express HIS/HER feeling , such as I am frustrated, sick, happy, etc. using appropriate language  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.  

Given a social situation or role-play scenario, STUDENT will identify expected vs. unexpected behaviors across multiple settings  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a social situation or role-play scenario, STUDENT will produce HIS/HER own ideas ( not mimicking or copying others’ ideas ) when entering or joining a conversation  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a social situation or role-play scenario, STUDENT will give and accept compliments  appropriately   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a social situation or role-play scenario, STUDENT will demonstrate comprehension of a variety of  verbal and nonverbal social cues  (e.g., eye rolls, checking watches, reduced eye contact, overt statements, etc.) by adjusting HIS/HER behavior based on these social cues  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Speech Therapy Goals for Expressive Language Delay

  • Utterance Expansion
  • Narrative Development
  • Gestures/Signs
  • Categorizations
  • Similarities
  • Differences
  • Comparisons
  • Multiple Meanings
  • Grammar Structure
  • Vocabulary Definitions

-Morphology

Given a writing or speaking task, STUDENT will use present progressive-tense verbs  (i.g., walking, running, laughing) appropriately   in a sentence or conversation  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a writing or speaking task, STUDENT will use regular/irregular plural markers  (i.g., apples/feet) appropriately   in a sentence or conversation  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a writing or speaking task, STUDENT will use article/number agreement  (i.g., an apple/the boys) appropriately   in a sentence or conversation  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a writing or speaking task, STUDENT will use present-tense verbs  (i.g., give, go, drink) appropriately   in a sentence or conversation  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a writing or speaking task, STUDENT will use future-tense verbs  (i.g., will drive, will stop, will park) appropriately   in a sentence or conversation  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a writing or speaking task, STUDENT will use regular/irregular past-tense verbs  (i.g., walked/ran) appropriately   in a sentence or conversation  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or story, STUDENT will use nouns to answer WHO or WHAT questions  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or story, STUDENT will use  verbs  to tell actions  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or story, STUDENT will use prepositional phrase  to answer WHERE questions  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or story, STUDENT will use prepositional phrase or adjective  to answer HOW questions  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object or picture, STUDENT will use   2 words to call attention to an object (e.g., “this ball”, “my shoe”)   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object or picture, STUDENT will use 2 words to show the disappearance of an object   (e.g., “no cracker”, “apple all gone”)   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object or picture, STUDENT will use   2 words to indicate recurrence  of an object   (e.g., “more cracker”)   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object or picture, STUDENT will use 2 words that contain an adjective and a noun  (e.g., “big bear”)   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object or picture, STUDENT will use   2 words to show possession of an object   (e.g., “Daddy car”)   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object or picture, STUDENT will use   2 words to show action object  (e.g., “read book “)   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object or picture, STUDENT will use   2 words to show the location of an object   (e.g., “dog car”)   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object or picture, STUDENT will use   2 words to show agent action  (e.g., “dog jump”)   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object or picture, STUDENT will use   2 words to show emotion  (e.g., “baby tired”)   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object or picture, STUDENT will use   2 words to achieve the desired end  of an object   (e.g., “go home”)   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given an object or picture, STUDENT will say 3 to 4-word utterances  (e.g., “dog sitting in car”)   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an activity, picture, or story, STUDENT will form grammatically correct simple sentences  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.  

Given an activity, picture, or story, STUDENT will use correct subject-verb agreement in sentences  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.  

Given an activity, picture, or story, STUDENT will use all necessary propositions in sentences  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.  

Given an activity, picture, or story, STUDENT will use compound sentences  (i.e., and, but, or, etc.)   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an activity, picture, or story, STUDENT will use correct subject-verb agreement  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Utterance Expansion

Given an object or picture, STUDENT will use 2-3 word utterances  to describe the object or picture  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an opportunity to ask a question/comment/describe, STUDENT will use 4-5 word utterances  to ask a question/comment/describe with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an orally presented sentence with missing words, STUDENT will identify missing words (i.e., articles, prepositions. etc.)   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an opportunity to ask a question/comment/describe, STUDENT will include all necessary words in a sentence  to ask a question/comment/describe with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object or picture, STUDENT will use descriptive words  to describe the object or picture  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an opportunity to express a want or need, STUDENT will use complete grammatically correct sentence  to express HIS/HER want or need  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an opportunity to tell past events, STUDENT will use simple complete grammatically correct sentence  to tell about past events  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an opportunity to express a want or need, STUDENT will use 2-4 words  to express HIS/HER want or need  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an opportunity to comment or share information, STUDENT will use2-4 words  to express HIS/HER comment or share information  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a wh-question, STUDENT will use2-4 words  to answer simple Wh-questions  (i.e., who, what, when, where, why, how)   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Narrative Development

Given visual cues (e.g., sequencing cards) and a story, STUDENT will sequence  the story  including problem and solution  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a story or activity, STUDENT will sequence  the story or activity that includes # parts  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an opportunity to tell a story, STUDENT will use  descriptive language  to tell their story  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an opportunity to tell a story from their past, STUDENT will  tell their story  with the appropriate number of details and in the right order  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a story or activity, STUDENT will use sequence words to verbally order a story or activity (e.g., first, next, then, after, last) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Gestures/Signs

Given a want or request, STUDENT will pair vocalizations with gestures  when indicating a want or requesting an object  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a want for “more”, STUDENT will use words and/or signs  to  ask for “more”  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a task or activity, STUDENT will use words and/or signs  to  indicate HE/SHE is “finished”  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a difficult task or activity, STUDENT will use words and/or signs  to  ask for “help”  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a “yes” or “no” question, STUDENT will use words and/or signs  to  answer the question with “yes” or “no”  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 10 common objects or pictures, STUDENT will verbally label the item  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a common object, noun, or action, STUDENT will verbally label the item  in  a phrase or sentence  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 10 common words, STUDENT will verbally name the word  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 10 common words, STUDENT will verbally name the word  in  a phrase or sentence with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object or picture, STUDENT will describe the object or picture  by stating the function of the item with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 10 words, STUDENT will describe the object or picture  by stating the function of the word with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Categorizations

Given a category, STUDENT will name (3-5) items  in that category (e.g., school items, home items, clothing, animals, colors, toys, etc.)   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.  

Given 3 to 5 items in a category (e.g., dog, cat, fish, etc.), STUDENT will identify the category  (e.g., school items, home items, clothing, animals, colors, toys, etc.)   and explain their relationships  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given  3 to 5 items, STUDENT will identify the item that does not belong in the group and explain why  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a category, STUDENT will name (3-5) items  in that category  and (1) item that does not belong in that category  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Similarities

Given 3 to 5 pictures, STUDENT will select 2 similar pictures  and  explain the similarities  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 3 to 5 words verbally, STUDENT will select 2 similar pictures  and  explain the similarities  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Differences

Given 3 to 5 pictures, STUDENT will select the different picture  and  explain the differences  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a list of 3 to 5 words verbally, STUDENT will identify the different word  and  explain the differences  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 3 to 5 words verbally, STUDENT will identify the different word  and  explain the differences  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a word pair verbally, STUDENT will explain the primary difference  between the  two words  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Comparisons

Given two object pictures, STUDENT will compare likeness(es)  and difference(s) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given two spoken words, STUDENT will compare likeness(es)  and difference(s) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given two concepts (e.g. flying vs. driving), STUDENT will compare likeness(es)  and difference(s) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

-Multiple Meanings

Given 2 pictures that represent different meanings of the same word , STUDENT will provide a definition for each  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 2 sentences that represent different meanings of the same word, STUDENT will provide a definition for each  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a multiple meaning word , STUDENT will provide 2 or more definitions for the  multiple meaning word  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Attributes

Given an object or picture, STUDENT will describe the object or picture  by identifying a minimum of (3) attributes (e.g., color, size, number etc.) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object or picture and asked a question, STUDENT will answer the question  by identifying a minimum of (5) attributes (e.g., color, size, number etc.) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 10 items presented verbally, STUDENT will describe the object or picture  by identifying a minimum of (3) attributes (e.g., color, size, number etc.) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Grammar Structure

Given an object, picture, or story, STUDENT will say a complete sentence using articles (i.e., “a”, “an”, “the”, and “some”) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object, picture, or story, STUDENT will say a complete sentence using demonstrative adjectives (i.e., “this”, “that”, “these”, and “those”) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object, picture, or story, STUDENT will say a complete sentence using plural nouns (i.e., s, es, and irregular plural forms) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object, picture, or story, STUDENT will say a complete sentence using possessive nouns (i.e., “the girl’s book”) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object, picture, or story, STUDENT will say a complete sentence using subject pronouns  (i.e., “I”, “he”, “she”, “you”, “we”, “they”) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object, picture, or story, STUDENT will say a complete sentence using object pronouns  (i.e., “me”, “him”, “her”, “you”, “us”, “them”) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object, picture, or story, STUDENT will say a complete sentence using possessive pronouns  (i.e., “my”, “mine”, “his”, “her/hers”, “you/yours”, “our/ours”, “their/theirs”) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object, picture, or story, STUDENT will say a complete sentence using reflexive pronouns  (i.e., “myself”, “himself”, “herself”, “yourself”, “yourselves”, “ourselves”, “themselves”) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object, picture, or story, STUDENT will say a complete sentence using present progressive verb tense  (i.e., “The girl is running”) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object, picture, or story, STUDENT will say a complete sentence using past progressive verb tense  (i.e., “The girl was running”) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object, picture, or story, STUDENT will say a complete sentence using present tense “s” and “es” marker  (i.e., “The girl runs”) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object, picture, or story, STUDENT will say a complete sentence using “has”/”have”  (i.e., “The girl has a book”) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object, picture, or story, STUDENT will say a complete sentence using regular past tense  (i.e., “The boy waited for the bus.”) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object, picture, or story, STUDENT will say a complete sentence using irregular past tense  (i.e., “ran”, “drove”, “drank”) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object, picture, or story, STUDENT will say a complete sentence using conjunctions  (i.e., “and”, “or”, “but”, “because”, “if”, “since”) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object, picture, or story, STUDENT will say a complete sentence using future tenses  (i.e., “The boy will go to school”) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object, picture, or story, STUDENT will say a complete sentence using negative sentence structures  (i.e., “will not/won’t”, “does not/doesn’t”) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object, picture, or story, STUDENT will ask yes/no questions  (i.e., “Is the boy hurt?”) in a complete sentence  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object, picture, or story, STUDENT will ask WH questions  (i.e., “What is the girl doing?”) in a complete sentence  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object, picture, or story, STUDENT will say a complete sentence using comparatives  (i.e., “The kitty is smaller than the tiger”) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object, picture, or story, STUDENT will say a complete sentence using superlatives  (i.e., “That is the best cookie.”) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an idiom with a visual cue, STUDENT will  accurately describe the meaning of the idiom   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given an idiom verbally with no visual cue, STUDENT will  accurately describe the meaning of the idiom  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given an idiom verbally, STUDENT will identify a social situation where the idiom may be used appropriately  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

-Vocabulary Definitions

Given 5 words with picture cues, STUDENT will define the word correctly  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object or picture, STUDENT will use 2-3 critical features  to describe the object or picture  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an emotional expression picture or story, STUDENT will use vocabulary to clearly  describe the feelings, ideas, or experiences  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object, picture, or word, STUDENT will identify synonyms  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object, picture, or word, STUDENT will identify antonyms  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 5 identified words in sentences, STUDENT will provide a synonym/antonym  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a story with highlighted words, STUDENT will provide a synonym/antonym for each highlighted word  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 10 pictures, STUDENT will match opposite pictures in pairs (i.e., happy/sad, up/down)   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object, picture, or word, STUDENT will identify the opposite  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an object or picture, STUDENT will describe the object or picture  by naming the item, identify attributes (color, size, etc.), function, or number  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a reading task, STUDENT will define unfamiliar words using context clues  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given common academic vocabulary, STUDENT will define prefix and/or suffix  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given common academic vocabulary, STUDENT will define the vocabulary word using a complete sentence with correct grammar  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Speech Therapy Language Goals

  • Following Directions
  • Answering Questions
  • Association
  • Multiple Meaning
  • Prepositions

-Vocabulary

Speech therapy goals for vocabulary.

Given 10 common nouns, STUDENT will identify the correct noun  by  pointing to the appropriate picture  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 10 common verbs, STUDENT will identify the  correct verb  by  pointing to the appropriate picture  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 10 common adjectives, STUDENT will identify the  correct adjective  by  pointing to the appropriate picture (size, shape, color, texture)   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 3 to 5 pictures, STUDENT will identify the  category items  by  pointing/grouping pictures into categories  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Following Directions

Given manipulatives (e.g., object, paper, pencil, scissors), STUDENT will follow a  1-step direction  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given manipulatives (e.g., object, paper, pencil, scissors), STUDENT will follow  2-step directions  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 2-step directions, STUDENT will follow the directions  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given manipulatives (e.g., object, paper, pencil, scissors), STUDENT will follow  3-step directions  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 3-step directions, STUDENT will follow the directions  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given manipulatives (e.g., object, paper, pencil, scissors), STUDENT will follow  multi-step directions  with location modifiers (i.e., spatial concepts)   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given manipulatives (e.g., object, paper, pencil, scissors), STUDENT will follow  multi-step directions  with quantity modifiers (i.e., numbers, more/less)   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given manipulatives (e.g., object, paper, pencil, scissors), STUDENT will follow  multi-step directions  with quality modifiers (i.e., size, color, shape)   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given manipulatives (e.g., object, paper, pencil, scissors), STUDENT will follow  multi-step directions  with pronoun modifiers (i.e., he, she, him, her, they, them)   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given verbal or written directions, STUDENT will identify the action words in the directions (e.g., “Read the book”…the action word is read)with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given verbal directions, STUDENT will follow conditional directions  (e.g., “If you are wearing a red shirt, stand up.”)with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Answering Questions

Given a story, activity, or classroom discussion, STUDENT will answer “yes or no” questions  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a story, activity, or classroom discussion, STUDENT will answer WH questions  (i.e., who, what, when, where, why, how)   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a verbal prompt, STUDENT will select and hand clinician the requested object or picture  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 3 objects or pictures at a time, STUDENT will select and hand clinician the requested object or picture  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 5 objects or pictures at a time, STUDENT will select and hand clinician the requested object or picture  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 5 objects or pictures at a time and given a function, STUDENT will point to the appropriate object or picture  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 5 action pictures at a time and given an action, STUDENT will point to the appropriate action picture  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Association

Given 5 objects or pictures at a time (e.g., ball, bat, car, fork, and ring) and asked what item is associated with … (e.g., with a seatbelt), STUDENT will select an item that is associated with the objects or pictures  (e.g., car)   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a word verbally, STUDENT will point to the appropriate object or picture associated with that word (e.g., ball/bat, fork/plate) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a category, STUDENT will correctly sort objects/pictures in that category  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 3 items in a category and 3 categories to choose from, STUDENT will correctly sort objects/pictures into the appropriate  category  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 3 different categories, STUDENT will correctly sort objects/pictures into each different  category  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 3 to 5 objects or pictures, STUDENT will select 2 similar objects or pictures  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 3 to 5 word verbally, STUDENT will select 2 similar words  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 3 to 5 objects or pictures and an attribute (e.g, color, size, shape, number, texture, etc.), STUDENT will 1 object or picture that does not share that same attribute  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 3 to 5 words and an attribute (e.g, color, size, shape, number, texture, etc.), STUDENT will 1 word  that does not share that same attribute  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Multiple Meaning

Given 3 to 5 objects or pictures and a multiple meaning word, STUDENT will select 2 objects or pictures  that represent different meanings of that word  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a multiple meaning word verbally, STUDENT will select 2 correct meanings from a group of 4 written choices  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 10 objects or pictures and a verbal description of a word, STUDENT will select the correct object or picture  to match the given verbal description  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 10 words and a verbal description of a word, STUDENT will select the correct word  to match the given verbal description  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Prepositions

Given 3 to 5 objects or pictures and a verbal preposition, STUDENT will point to the correct object or picture  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given object(s) and a verbal or written prepositions directive, STUDENT will follow the directions and  act out the preposition using the given object(s)  (e.g., “Put the doll under the table.”)   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a verbal question, STUDENT will select the picture of the noun that tells WHO and WHAT  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a story read aloud, STUDENT will select the picture of the noun that tells WHO and WHAT  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a verbal question, STUDENT will select the picture of the  verb  that tells the action  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a story read aloud, STUDENT will select the picture of the  verb  that tells the action  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a verbal question, STUDENT will select the picture  that tells WHERE  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a story read aloud, STUDENT will select the picture  that tells WHERE  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a verbal question, STUDENT will select the picture that tells HOW  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a story read aloud, STUDENT will select the picture that tells HOW  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a two word phrase that calls attention to an object or picture (e.g., “that car”, “her toy”), STUDENT will answer “yes or no” if the phrase describes the object or picture accurately   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given an object or picture and a phrase that shows the  disappearance  (e.g., “crackers all gone”, “no cookie”), STUDENT will answer “yes or no” if the phrase describes the object or picture accurately   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given an object or picture and a phrase that shows the  recurrence  (e.g., “more crackers”), STUDENT will answer “yes or no” if the phrase describes the object or picture accurately   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given an object or picture and a phrase that contains an  adjective and a noun  (e.g., “red shoe”, “big ball”), STUDENT will answer “yes or no” if the phrase describes the object or picture accurately   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given an object or picture and a phrase that shows  possession  (e.g., “Dad’s cat”, “girl’s shoe”), STUDENT will answer “yes or no” if the phrase describes the object or picture accurately   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given an object or picture and a phrase that uses  action object form  (e.g., “Tie shoe”, “read book “), STUDENT will answer “yes or no” if the phrase describes the object or picture accurately   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given an object or picture and a phrase that indicates the  location  (e.g., “pencil down”, “car outside”), STUDENT will answer “yes or no” if the phrase describes the object or picture accurately   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given an object or picture and a phrase that uses  agent action form  (e.g., “boy jump”, “girl eat”), STUDENT will answer “yes or no” if the phrase describes the object or picture accurately   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given an object or picture and a phrase that shows an  emotion  (e.g., “girl sad”, “man angry”), STUDENT will answer “yes or no” if the phrase describes the object or picture accurately   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given an object or picture and a phrase to achieve a  desired end  (e.g., “shoe on”, “go home”), STUDENT will answer “yes or no” if the phrase describes the object or picture accurately   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a phrase or sentence that includes  articles  (e.g., “a”, “an”, “the”, and “some”), STUDENT will answer “yes or no” if the phrase or sentence uses the articles  accurately   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a phrase or sentence that includes  adjectives  (e.g., “this”, “that”, “these”, and “those”), STUDENT will answer “yes or no” if the phrase or sentence uses the adjectives  accurately   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a phrase or sentence that includes plurals  (e.g., s, es) and irregular plural nouns , STUDENT will answer “yes or no” if the phrase or sentence uses the plurals  accurately   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a phrase or sentence that includes  possessive nouns  (e.g., “the girl’s bike”), STUDENT will answer “yes or no” if the phrase or sentence uses the possessive  accurately   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a phrase or sentence that includes  subject pronouns  (e.g., “I”, “he”, “she”, “you”, “we” “they”), STUDENT will answer “yes or no” if the phrase or sentence uses the pronoun  accurately   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a phrase or sentence that includes  object pronouns  (e.g., “me”, “him”, “her”, “you”, “us”, “them”), STUDENT will answer “yes or no” if the phrase or sentence uses the pronoun  accurately   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a phrase or sentence that includes  possessive pronouns  (e.g., “my/mine”, “his”, “her/hers”, “your/yours”, “our/ours”, “their/theirs”), STUDENT will answer “yes or no” if the phrase or sentence uses the pronoun  accurately   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a phrase or sentence that includes  reflexive pronouns  (e.g., “myself”, “himself”, “herself”, “yourself”, “yourselves”, “ourselves”, “themselves”), STUDENT will answer “yes or no” if the phrase or sentence uses the pronoun  accurately   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a phrase or sentence that includes present progressive verb tense  (e.g., “The man is running”, “The girls are waving”), STUDENT will answer “yes or no” if the phrase or sentence uses the verb tense  accurately   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a phrase or sentence that includes  past progressive verb tense  (e.g., “The man was running”, “The girls were waving”), STUDENT will answer “yes or no” if the phrase or sentence uses the verb tense  accurately   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a phrase or sentence that includes  present tense “s” and “es” marker  (e.g., “The boy jogs”, and “The bee buzzes”), STUDENT will answer “yes or no” if the phrase or sentence uses the tense  accurately   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a phrase or sentence that includes  “have” and “has”  (e.g., “The boy has a dog”, and “The girls have ice skating”), STUDENT will answer “yes or no” if the phrase or sentence uses the tense  accurately   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a phrase or sentence that includes  regular past tense  (e.g., “The dog jumped”), STUDENT will answer “yes or no” if the phrase or sentence uses the tense  accurately   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a phrase or sentence that includes  irregular past tense  (e.g., “The boy ran”), STUDENT will answer “yes or no” if the phrase or sentence uses the tense  accurately   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Speech Therapy Goals for Auditory Discrimination

Given multi-step directions, STUDENT will follow 2-step, 3-step, and 4-step directions of  increasing length and complexity  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.  

Given 10 words, STUDENT will recognize the differences between same or different words  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.  

Given a sentence, STUDENT will remember and repeat  of  increasing length and complexity  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a word broken down into isolated sounds, STUDENT will combine the isolated sounds together to form words  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Speech Therapy Goals for Phonological Awareness

Given 10 words, STUDENT will identify the sounds in the words  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 10 words, STUDENT will identify the number of sounds in the words  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 10 words, STUDENT will identify the similarities sounds in the words  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 2 words with matching beginning sounds or ending sounds, STUDENT will identify and/or match the words with the same beginning sounds or ending sounds  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a sentence with two rhyming words, STUDENT will identify the two rhyming words  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a rhyming word, STUDENT will produce two or more words that rhyme with the given word  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a word, STUDENT will substitute initial and/or final sounds  to  create new words (i.g., cat/fat; man, mad) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Speech Therapy Goals for Autism

  • Play Skills
  • Joint Attention
  • Following Instructions
  • Getting the Teacher’s Attention
  • Friend Making
  • General Conversation
  • Perspective
  • Problem Solving
  • Dealing with Feelings
  • Alternatives to Aggression
  • Predictions/Inferences

-Play Skills

Given a toy(s), STUDENT will play with the toy(s) using their appropriate function  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a toy(s), STUDENT will demonstrate parallel play with peers for X minutes  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a toy(s), STUDENT will demonstrate symbolic play  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a toy(s), STUDENT will demonstrate pretend play  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a toy(s), STUDENT will take X turns during a play activity with peer or teacher  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an opportunity to offer someone help, STUDENT will ask what the other person needs, listen, provide the help requested  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given offered help from a peer or adult, STUDENT will accept the help and thank the person, or politely decline the help  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an opportunity to volunteer, STUDENT will look at the person, use a clear voice, ask to volunteer for a specific task or activity  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a task or activity to take turns, STUDENT will wait for HIS/HER turn, sit or stand quietly, keep HIS/HER legs and arms still, avoid whining or begging, and engage in activity or task when it is HIS/HER turn  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an opportunity to borrow something, STUDENT will make a polite request to borrow an item or material, accept “no” as an answer, and if the other person agrees promptly return the materials in the same condition  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a game activity, STUDENT will display good sportsmanship and play by the rules, accepting winning without bragging, and accepting losing without complaining  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a toy or object and asked to share, STUDENT will share the toy or object with a peer or adult  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Joint Attention

Given an activity with a partner, STUDENT will demonstrate joint attention for X minutes  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a communication partner, STUDENT will point to gain the communication partner’s attention  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a communication partner, STUDENT will use eye gaze to direct the communication partner’s attention  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a communication partner, STUDENT will track the eye gaze of others and predict what they are thinking and will modify their behavior based on what others are looking at  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Following Instructions

Given a direction, STUDENT will follow the 1-step direction  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 2-step directions, STUDENT will follow the 2-step directions  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 3-step directions, STUDENT will follow the 3-step directions  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given verbal directions, STUDENT will begin task with only 1 prompt within 1 minute of receiving the instructions  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given written directions, STUDENT will read the instructions, follow each instruction in order, and ask for help if needed  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given verbal or written directions to change to another activity, STUDENT will change to the new activity within 1 minute of receiving the instructions  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Getting the Teacher’s Attention

Given the need to get the teacher’s attention, STUDENT will  look at the teacher, raise HIS/HER hand, wait to be acknowledged, and ask their question  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a need to ask a question, STUDENT will get the person’s attention appropriately, look at the person, use a pleasant tone of voice, use words such as “please”, “would”, “may I”, and listen to the person’s answer  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a need to ask for help, STUDENT will look at the person, ask if he or she has time to help, clearly describe what kind of help HE/SHE needs  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a social setting, STUDENT will identify expected and unexpected behaviors in themselves and others  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a social setting, STUDENT will demonstrate expected behaviors  that are expected in that setting  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given expected and unexpected behaviors, STUDENT will identify how the expected and unexpected behaviors affect the thoughts and feelings of others  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given feedback regarding HIS/HER behavior, STUDENT will modify their behavior based on the feedback  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an example of their own behavior, STUDENT will identify how their own behavior will affect the thoughts and feelings of others  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given others’ behaviors, STUDENT will identify HIS/HER thoughts about others’ behaviors  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given actions from others, STUDENT will modify their own behavior based on the actions of others  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given social interactions, STUDENT will maintain appropriate personal space and maintain safe hands and body  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given classroom or small group discussion, STUDENT will demonstrate active listening skills (e.g., body facing the speaker, keep mouth and body still, nodding head to show listening, asking questions and/or making comments) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given different social settings, STUDENT will monitor HIS/HER volume and adjust it based on setting and/or situation  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given classroom or small group discussion, STUDENT will make on-topic and appropriate comments  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a specific behavior, STUDENT will identify how it makes others feel , the consequences, and how that then makes HIM/HER feel about HIMSELF/HERSELF  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a social situation, STUDENT will identify how others are feeling and identify at least one visual cue that lead them to that conclusion  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a task, STUDENT will listen carefully, gather materials, and begin working quietly  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a task, STUDENT will read the directions and attempt the assignment before asking the teacher for help  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Group Work

Given a group activity, STUDENT will cooperate with others, use a kind voice, and follow the set group guidelines  for the activity with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.  

Given a group activity, STUDENT will use appropriate volume level  for the activity and setting with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.  

Given a group activity, STUDENT will discuss what goal needs to be achieved with the group, decided HIS/HER role is going to be, accept help or feedback from peers, follow rules, share materials, and give praise to others,  for the activity with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.  

Given a new class period, STUDENT will come prepared for class by bringing all necessary materials (i.e., books, papers, homework, and writing tools) , being on time, and handing in assignments as requested by the teacher  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a new class period, STUDENT will determine what materials HE/SHE needs for class, gather materials, and only take those materials HE/SHE needs for class  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.     Given an assignment, STUDENT will write down the assignment in HIS/HER planner or electronic device  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a make-up or missed assignment, STUDENT will ask the teacher for the make-up or missed assignment  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Friend Making

Given an unfamiliar person to meet, STUDENT will introduce HIMSELF/HERSELF by looking at the person, use an appropriate greeting (i.e., Hi, my name is…”) and telling the person it was nice meeting HIM/HER when leaving  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.  

Given a familiar or unfamiliar person to greet, STUDENT will look at the person, use a kind voice, and say “hi” or “hello” following all 3 steps with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.  

Given an opportunity to compliment someone, STUDENT will look at the person, use a kind voice, give HIM/HER a compliment, and give the person time to respond  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.  

Given a compliment, STUDENT will look at the person, use a kind voice to thank the person (i.e., “Thank you, it’s my favorite shirt.”) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-General Conversation

Given a greeting from a peer or adult, STUDENT will acknowledge the greeting by  looking at the person and  returning the greeting  (e.g., “hello”, “hi”, “how are you?”, etc.)   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a small group or classroom discussion, STUDENT will initiate the conversation (e.g., ask a question, make a comment, give a compliment, etc.)   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a need or desire, STUDENT will  spontaneously communicate HIS/HER needs or desire (e.g., “I need…”, “I want…”)   with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a small group discussion, STUDENT will take turns during the conversation with a peer or an adult with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a small group discussion, STUDENT will identify expected and unexpected behaviors for a conversation (e.g., topic maintenance, topic changes, asking questions, on-topic comments, unrelated comments, appropriate interruptions, long talking turns, not responding, initiating conversations, etc.) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a conversational partner, STUDENT will describe the conversational partner’s emotional responses of HIM/HER when HE/SHE uses expected and unexpected behaviors during a conversation  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a small group discussion, STUDENT will demonstrate expected behaviors during preferred and un-preferred conversational topics  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a conversational partner, STUDENT will identify how that person is feeling based on observing their body language  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a small group discussion, STUDENT will use conversation maintenance strategies  (i.e., making comments, take turns, ask questions, etc.) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a conversational partner, STUDENT will maintain a topic for at least 3 conversational turns  (e.g., ask partner-focused questions, make comments, etc) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a conversation, STUDENT will look at the speaker, ask questions when appropriate, and not interrupt others  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a conversation, STUDENT will use the appropriate volume based on the setting  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a conversation, STUDENT will appropriately join the conversation by looking at the people, waiting for a moment when no one else is talking, make a comment or ask a question that relates to the topic  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a conversational partner who is busy talking with someone else, STUDENT will wait until the other person is finished speaking, look at the person, get their attention  (“Excuse me…”, “Do you have a minute…”) and wait for the person to acknowledge HIM/HER before continuing  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.  

Given a need to interrupt, STUDENT will look at the person, wait for the person to acknowledge them, begin with “Excuse me for interrupting, but…” make a specific request or give information  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a small group or classroom discussion, STUDENT will demonstrate active listening skills   (track the speaker with their eyes, keep mouth and body still and quiet, nodding head to show listening, ask questions and/or make comments, etc.) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a communication partner and a communication breakdown, STUDENT will use  communication breakdown strategies,  such as restating what HE/SHE said, adjusting volume, using a slow rate, use precise articulation, move hands/items away from mouth  to improve HIS/HER intelligibility level so that the listener can understand HIS/HER request or question with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Perspective

Given a social interaction, STUDENT will accurately identify another’s perspective  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given different conversational partners (e.g., peer, teacher, authority figure, etc.), STUDENT will adjust HIS/HER language style and topics of conversation based on the conversation partner  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or social interaction, STUDENT will identify another person’s emotion and why HE/SHE is feeling that way  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Problem Solving

Given a problem and problem solving graphic organizer , STUDENT will identify 3 solutions, the 3 consequences of those solutions, then determine the best solution, and explain why that is the best solution  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a problem, STUDENT will appropriately  identify the size of the problem  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given problems at differing sizes, STUDENT will identify appropriate reaction size to the problem  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Dealing with Feelings

Given a time when the student is angry, STUDENT will use a calming strategy (e.g., breathe slowly, take a break, count to 10, listen to music, etc.) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given warning and a change in routine, STUDENT will identify exactly what is changing, ask questions, remain calm, and explain HIS/HER feelings of concern  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given warning and a change in routine, STUDENT will accept the change without becoming upset  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a social interaction, STUDENT will identify HIS/HER emotion and why HE/SHE is feeling that way  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Alternatives to Aggression

Given a real-life or role-play scenario, STUDENT will demonstrate how to accept teacher help to make an appropriate decision during a conflict situation  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a real-life or role-play conflict scenario, STUDENT will demonstrate appropriate peer mediation skills to resolve the conflict  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a real-life or role-play conflict scenario, STUDENT will remain calm and relaxed, listen to the other person, determine what they can agree on  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given criticism or feedback, STUDENT will look at the person, say “okay”, and not argue  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a problem, STUDENT will define exactly what the problem is, brainstorm possible options, consider disadvantages and advantages of options, and choose the best option  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a defeat or loss in a game, STUDENT will look at the person who won , remain calm, and congratulate the other person  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given an upsetting situation, STUDENT will express HIS/HER anger with non-aggressive words to describe how HE/SHE feels  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Predictions/Inferencing

Given a picture, STUDENT will make a prediction or inference about the picture with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a short story, STUDENT will make a prediction or inference about the story with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a social scenario, STUDENT will make a prediction or inference about the scenario and identify at least one visual cue that contributed to HIS/HER inference  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Augmentative Alternative Communication

Speech therapy goals for aac.

  • Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS)
  • Sign Language

-Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS)

Given a want or need, STUDENT will request a want or a need by pulling off a picture symbol and placing it into the teacher’s hand  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.  

Given a want or need, STUDENT will choose the “I want” or “I need” symbol plus the desired item , then place them both onto the sentence strip , then and hand the sentence strip to the teacher  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.  

Given a simple question, such as “What do you want?”, STUDENT will independently choose a picture symbol to answer a simple question  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.    

Given augmentative symbols or device, STUDENT will carry device to various school and community locations  (lunchroom, classroom, recess etc.) with minimal prompting with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given augmentative symbols or device, STUDENT will independently navigate to the “home” page  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a question or community helper or form, STUDENT will identify HIS/HER contact information  selecting (i.e. name, address, phone number, etc.) using augmentative symbols or device  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a community sign, STUDENT will identify the community sign  (i.e. restroom, stop sign, crosswalk, exit, etc.) using augmentative symbols or device  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a question, STUDENT will express HIS/HER preference selecting “yes or no” using augmentative symbols or device  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a group of pictures, STUDENT will identify the category of the pictures using augmentative symbols or device  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or object, STUDENT will identify the color  of the picture or object using augmentative symbols or device  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or object, STUDENT will identify the shape  of the picture or object using augmentative symbols or device  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or object, STUDENT will identify the attributes  (hot/cold, big/little, soft/hard) of the picture or object using augmentative symbols or device  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a group of objects, STUDENT will count the objects  and select the appropriate number of objects (1-10)  using augmentative symbols or device  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a picture or object, STUDENT will select matching word  using augmentative symbols or device  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 5 pictures of facial emotions, STUDENT will identify the emotion  using  augmentative symbols or device  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities. 

Given a spoken question, STUDENT will select the desired activity  using augmentative symbols or device  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a communication partner, STUDENT will initiate a conversation with a peer or teacher (i.e. hello, how are you ?, etc.) using augmentative symbols or device  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a communication partner, STUDENT will maintain a conversation  and engage in up to 3 conversational exchanges with a peer or teacher using augmentative symbols or device  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given augmentative symbols or device, STUDENT will select HIS/HER meal choices  (in the school lunchroom, restaurant, etc.) with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a communication partner, STUDENT will spontaneously make a request or greet a peer or teacher using augmentative symbols or device  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a time of frustration, STUDENT will independently indicate a break or refuse an undesired item or activity  (i.e. “no”, “I don’t want”, “I don’t like”, etc.)   using augmentative symbols or device  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a communication partner, STUDENT will inform others of past events  using augmentative symbols or device  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a communication partner and a communication breakdown, STUDENT will repair the communication breakdown  using augmentative symbols or device  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

-Sign Language

Given a need and a verbal prompt, STUDENT will sign a basic “need” sign , such as ( help, more, done, want, need etc.) to make a request  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a need, STUDENT will sign a basic “need” sign , such as ( help, more, done, want, need etc.) to make a request  spontaneously across multiple school environments and the community  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a conversational partner, STUDENT will  introduce HIMSELF/HERSELF by fingerspelling HIS/HER name or using HIS/HER name sign  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a signed picture or object, STUDENT will receptively identify the picture or object that was signed with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 5 pictures or objects, STUDENT will expressively label  the pictures or objects using sign with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given 5 pictures of facial emotions, STUDENT will identify the emotion  using sign with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Speech Therapy Goals for Figurative Language

Given a reading task, STUDENT will identify and interpret the meaning of  idioms , metaphors, similes, or proverbs  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a writing task, STUDENT will create similes and/or metaphors in a sentence or paragraph  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a reading task, STUDENT will make predictions and inferences based on  textual evidence  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a reading task, STUDENT will make inferences based on a character in literature   about why they say, feel, and do the things that they do  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Speech Therapy Goals Written Language

Given a writing task, STUDENT will produce  grammatically correct sentences  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a writing task, STUDENT will vary HIS/HER use of sentence starters to enhance HIS/HER writing with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a short story or video, STUDENT will answer wh -questions (who, what, when, where, why, & how) using complete sentences  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Given a graphic organizer, STUDENT will produce a five paragraph essay including an  introduction, topic sentences, transitions, and conclusion  with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Speech Therapy Goals Intelligibility

Given a communication partner and a communication breakdown, STUDENT will use  clear slow speech  and pausing to gather HIS/HER thoughts to improve HIS/HER intelligibility level so that the listener can understand HIS/HER request or question with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities.

Send me the FREE IEP Goal Bank!

Speech therapy goals conclusion.

I hope you find these speech therapy goals helpful or they gave you an idea for how to write speech therapy goals.

Let me know if there are other speech therapy goals and objectives that would be helpful or if you have examples of speech therapy goals.

Monday 12th of December 2022

This is one of most GO-TO Goal banks. Thank you so much!

Melissa Berg

Tuesday 27th of December 2022

Hi Jannette, I'm SO happy to hear that this is your GO_TO goal bank. Wishing you all my best! Melissa

Tuesday 4th of October 2022

Hi! I use this goal bank frequently but am always wondering why it was decided to label the goals for D/deaf and Hard of Hearing people as "Hearing Impaired/Impairment"? From my understanding and work with the DHH population, most prefer the terms, deaf, Deaf, or Hard of Hearing rather than Hearing Impaired. Just wanted to check in about it! Thanks!

Wednesday 5th of October 2022

Hi Melissa, Thanks so much for the feedback! I have made the updated suggestion. All my best, Melissa

Janet Pevsner

Monday 19th of September 2022

Your materials are sooo great AND you are soooo generous with your materials! Thank you so much for this Melissa.

Tuesday 20th of September 2022

Hi Janet, Thank you for your kind and thoughtful words! It means so much to me. I'm happy to know you like my materials! Wishing you all the best, Melissa

Monday 29th of August 2022

I love your material, it's so helpful! Thank you so much!

Lorena Bazarte

Thursday 25th of August 2022

Can you include goals for consultation for students in language articulation and fluency--when students have mastered the objectives but want to keep them in consult to monitor that they maintain their skills.

Saturday 27th of August 2022

Hi Lorena, I love this idea! I currently don't have anything in the works, but can add this to my future ideas list! All my best, Melissa

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Bright Hub Education

Creating IEP Goals for Decision Making Skills and Goal Setting

Creating IEP Goals for Decision Making Skills and Goal Setting

Life Control

Creating IEP goals for decision-making skills allows students the right and ability to maintain control over and direction of their own

lives. Goals let the learner make decisions and choices about all things that have a bearing upon his or her daily life. Underlying these decision-making goals is the special education student’s capacity to realize his or her own challenges and strengths – what works best.

Action plans and time lines remain important to attain these goals. It is imperative that the IEP team stay cognizant that goals centered on decision-making do not involve merely one skill. Self-determination, choice-making, problem-solving, self-awareness, communication, self-regulation, goal-setting, self-advocacy and leadership all comprise the formation of decision-making skills that lead to the promotion of effective well-being. With the attainment of appropriate decision-making skills, student performance increases with the likelihood to attain positive post-school outcomes.

Foremost, students should participate in the process of creating IEP goals to help make choices concerning their needs, likes and accommodations. A student’s active attendance at the IEP meetings and realization of his or her rights remain paramount for success. Teachers and all IEP team members need to support a student’s participation to develop the most appropriate goals. Goal setting always involves a student-centered approach toward planning for both the immediate and long-term future. When the IEP team aids the student in making wise choices and respects his or her value in society, goals are more readily achieved. The student is more apt to attain IEP decision-making goals with the realization that even small successes are significant. When determining goals always remember that a child has a home life and a school life. Negotiate.

Decision-Making and Problem-Solving

Be sure you realize the difference between decision-making skills and problem-solving skills when coming up with a student’s goals. Problem-solving involves a set of actions or activities created for systematically analyzing a situation, then creating, implementing and assessing its solutions, whereas decision-making skills are a means for making choices every step of the problem-solving procedure.

Always remember when making IEP goals that decision-making plays a constant role in problem-solving at every step of the process. As a good source of reference, the IEP team might want to checkout learning standards for individual states, since some chart decision-making goals. Whether it is science, physical development, health or fine arts, the following important goals (covering early elementary to late high school) may be applicable to decision-making skills within individual disciplines:

  • Demonstrate procedures for preventing conflict, communicating positively and resolving differences.
  • Differentiate between positive and negative behaviors.
  • Identify positive verbal and nonverbal skills.
  • Identify causes and consequences of conflict among students.
  • Apply decision-making skills that relate to the protection and promotion of individual well-being.
  • Recognize how choices can affect well-being.
  • Describe key elements of the decision-making process.
  • Demonstrate basic skills of refusal.
  • Describe times/situations when refusal skills are needed.
  • Analyze the impact of peer pressure on decision making.
  • Apply a decision-making process to address personal issues and problems.
  • Demonstrate refusal and conflict resolution skills to develop and maintain healthy relationships with family, peers and others in a socially acceptable manner.
  • Identify how to make a good decision/choice.
  • Examine choices available in order to make a good choice/decision.
  • Identify the positive and negative consequences of making a decision.

Responsibility

Goals must take into account safety, ethical and societal considerations when making decisions. When designing goals for elementary students, the IEP team should focus on the student’s capability to respect his or her rights and others’ rights: avoiding acts that provoke and hurt others wrongfully. At the middle-school level goals concentrate on fairness, compassion, honesty and respect in an evaluation of others’ needs when making a decision. Goals in high school reach the level of personal responsibility in ethical decision-making. In essence, a high school student can apply ethical reasoning to assess societal procedures.

Decision-making goals in elementary school may also involve the identification of norms in society and safety as a behavior guide, and how this knowledge bears upon decision-making. Once a child reaches middle school, goals delve more into an analysis of the reasons both school and society maintain rules. In high school societal and authoritarian rules present expectations, so their influence on personal actions and decisions remains an assessment focus in goal making. How the culture and norms of society influence behavior and decisions is also evident in high school IEP goal creation.

In regards to creating decision-making goals that apply to the responsibility of school and social situations, elementary students identify the array of decisions to be made at school. They apply those decision-making steps systematically to a solution. Goal-setting for the middle-school student centers more on the analysis of how decision-making skills can improve academic performance through good study habits. The high school student will concentrate on information gathering for goals, creating alternatives to solutions and the expectations of decision consequences. Goals for high school students take into account how present decisions affect a future career or college choice. Goals that relate to all students reflect positive choices to foster classroom interaction and assessment strategies to avoid peer pressure and promote positive interpersonal and group relationships.

Additionally, the focus must not remain on personal individual goals but concentrate on the well-being of family, school, community and society. The elementary and middle-school student stays focused on decisions regarding contributions to the family and community through both evaluation and participation. High school students may plan and implement their own participation. Goals for the older students may involve cooperating with classmates and others in a project that addresses the needs of the entire community.

Positive Outcomes

The ability to solve problems responsibly and make accurate decisions that reach positive outcomes in personal, family, school and community behaviors is required for personal well-being. The responsible behavior includes avoiding risky behaviors, fairness and honesty. When the appropriate results are maintained from creating IEP goals for decision-making skills, students are able to anticipate consequences, and come up with alternative solutions through assessment and learning from their own decision-making. The behavior contributes to the classroom, family, school, environment and community to promote expected citizenship in society.

  • Decision Making and Problem Solving , FEMA website.
  • Social Emotional Learning Standards from Illinois State Board of Education.
  • Tools for Teachers from the University of Massachusetts Boston.

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Special Ed Lesson Plans

Math IEP Goals For Special Education

Math IEP Goals

Drafting IEP goals can be difficult, so here are a few math IEP goals (across various ability levels) to get you started. Please adapt and modify to meet the specific needs of your students. Keep in mind a goal should be a skill you believe is achievable by the student in 1 school year. You can always do an addendum if a student has met all criteria for the goal/objectives.

Remember, when writing objectives, break down the goal into smaller steps. You can lessen the percentage of accuracy, the number of trials (3/5 vs 4/5), or amount of prompting. Just make sure the objectives build on each other and are working towards mastery.

The reason why I always list accuracy at 100% when writing Math goals is because the answer is either right or wrong, an answer to a math problem can’t be 50% correct. So feel free to play with the ## of trials for accuracy.

Number Identification:

Goal: Student will independently identify numbers 1-20 (verbally, written, or pointing) with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Goal: When verbally prompted by teacher to “point to the number _________”, Student will independently select the correct number with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Goal: Student will independently count in rote order numbers 1-25 with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Goal: Student will independently count by 2, 3, 5, 10 starting from 0-30 verbally or written, with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

One-to-one Correspondence:

Goal: When given up to 10 objects, Student will independently count and determine how many objects there are (verbally, written, or by pointing to a number) with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly/monthly.

Goal: When given up to 10 items/objects, Student will independently count and move the items to demonstrate 1:1 correspondence and identify how many there are with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Goal: Given 10 addition problems, Student will independently add single digit numbers with regrouping with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials as measured quarterly.

Goal:  Student will independently add a single digit number to a double digit number with and without regrouping with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Goal: Student will independently add double digit numbers to double digit numbers with (or without) regrouping with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Adding with Number Line:

Goal: Given 10 addition problems and using a number line, Student will independently add single digit numbers with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly. 

Subtraction:

Goal: Student will independently subtract a single digit number form a double digit number with and without regrouping with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Goal: Given 10 subtraction problems, Student will independently subtract double digit numbers from double digit numbers with and without regrouping with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Goal: Student will independently subtract money/price amounts from one another with and without regrouping, while carrying the decimal point with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials as measured quarterly.

Goal: Using a number line, Student will independently subtract numbers (20 or less) with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Telling Time:

Goal: Student will independently tell time to the half hour on an analog clock (verbally or written) with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly. 

Goal: Student will independently tell time to the hour on an analog clock (verbally or written) with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Elapsed Time:

Goal: Given a problem with a start time and end time, Student will independently determine how much time has elapsed with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Goal: Given a problem with a start time and duration of activity/event, Student will independently determine what the end time is with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Dollar More:

Goal: Using the dollar more strategy, Student will independently identify the next dollar up when given a price amount with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Goal: Student will independently identify the next dollar amount when given a price, determine how much is needed to make the purchase, and count out the necessary amount (using fake school money) with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Goal: When given a price, student will identify which number is the dollar amount with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.      

Money Identification/Counting Money:

Goal: When given a quarter, dime, nickel, and penny, Student will identify the coin and corresponding value with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Goal: When given a random amount of coins (all of one type), Student will independently count the coins with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Goal: When given a mix of coins (to include quarter, dime, nickel, penny), Student will independently count the coins with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Goal: When given a mixture of coins and dollar bills, Student will independently count the money with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Goal: When give 2, 3, and 4 digit numbers, Student will independently round to the nearest tens, hundreds, thousands independently with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Greater than/Less than:

Goal: Given 2 numbers, pictures, or groups of items, Student will independently determine which number is greater than/less than/equal by selecting or drawing the appropriate symbol (<,>, =) with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Goal: Student will independently count objects or pictures of objects and tally the corresponding amount (up to 15) with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials as measured quarterly.

Goal: Given a number, up to 20, Student will independently tally the corresponding number with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Goal: Given data and a bar graph template, Student will independently construct a bar graph to display the data and answer 3 questions about the data with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Goal: Given a line, pie, or bar graph, Student will independently answer questions about each set of data with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Goal: Given data and a blank graph template, Student will independently construct the graph to display the appropriate data with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Goal: Student will independently identify the numerator and denominator in a fraction with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Goal: When given a picture of a shape divided into parts, Student will independently color the correct sections in to represent the fraction given with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Goal: Student will independently add fractions with like denominators with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Word Problems:

Goal: Student will independently solve one step addition and subtraction word problems with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Goal: Student will independently solve two step word problems (mixed addition and subtraction) with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Goal: Student will independently solve one and two step multiplication world problems with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Goal: Student will independently read a one or two step word problem, identify which operation is to be used, and solve it with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Goal: Given a word problem, Student will independently determine which operation is to be used (+,-,x, /) with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Even/Odd Numbers:

Goal: When given a number, student will independently identify if the number is odd or even (written or verbally), with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Measurement:

Goal: Given varying lines and objects, Student will independently estimate the length of the object/picture, measure it using a ruler, and identify how long the object/picture is with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Multiplication:

Goal: Student will independently solve 10 multiplication facts (2, 3, and 5 facts) with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Goal: Student will independently solve 20 multiplication facts (facts up to 9) with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Goal: Given a division problem (where the divisor is _____), Student will independently solve it with 100% accuracy on 4 out of 5 trials measured quarterly.

Feel free to use and edit as necessary. It’s up to you how often you want to measure the goals, but remind parents that even if the goal says 5/5 times quarterly, it doesn’t mean you’re only working on it those 5 times. That is just the number of times you’ll take official data. Just make sure it’s a reasonable ## so you have time to take all the data you need. Especially if you have multiple goals/objectives to take data for!

Happy drafting!

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IMAGES

  1. {ABCs of IEPs} G is for Goals and Grades

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  2. 5 IEP Goals for Kindergarten

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  3. Resources for Supporting IEP Goals at Home

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  4. IEP Goals For Math Problem Solving

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  5. CONFLICT RESOLUTION: Social Skills IEP Goals, Data Sheets, (Preschool-5th grade)

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  6. Problem solving iep goals

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COMMENTS

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  4. 76 IEP Goals Every Educator Should Have in Their Goal Bank

    The goals should also include the accuracy and number of trials that the student needs to complete to show mastery. The accuracy and number of trials will depend on the student's ability, strengths, and skills. (Typical accuracy and trials are 80% 4-out-of-5 trials.) Finally, the goals should include the level of support the student needs.

  5. Executive Functioning IEP Goals: A Complete Guide and Goal Bank

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  6. Effective IEP Goals for Developing Problem-Solving Skills

    IEP Goals for Problem-Solving Skills Here are some SMART IEP goals to help students develop problem-solving skills: Goal 1: The student will identify and classify problems as big or small in 90% of situations within six months.

  7. Effective IEP Goals for High School Students' Problem-Solving Skills

    Implementing and Measuring Progress To effectively implement these IEP goals, educators should: Collaborate with specialists and involve them in the goal-setting process. Provide regular feedback and support to the student. Use data collection tools to monitor progress and make necessary adjustments. Conclusion

  8. Executive Functioning IEP Goals

    Executive functioning is a set of mental processes that help you gain control over your actions so you can achieve your goals. Executive function skills allow us to plan and organize our daily activities, time, and behaviors as well as change or shift between tasks. Executive functioning abilities are sometimes referred to as executive skills ...

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    To improve problem-solving skills in students, consider incorporating the following SMART IEP goals and accompanying strategies: Goal: The student will identify problems in various situations with 80% accuracy over three consecutive trials. Strategy: Teach students to recognize common problems using role-playing scenarios and group discussions.

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    This blog post will guide educators in creating effective IEP goals to enhance these skills in elementary students. Understanding Smart Decision-Making Skills. ... Goal 1: Improve problem-solving abilities. Strategies and Activities: Teach students the steps of problem-solving (identify the problem, brainstorm solutions, evaluate options ...

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    Here are some specific SMART IEP goals to improve problem-solving skills in high school students: Goal: The student will demonstrate the ability to identify a problem and request assistance from a teacher or peer in 4 out of 5 opportunities. Strategies and Activities: Role-play scenarios, social stories, and guided practice with peers.

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    Planning and basic organizational skills require a person to be able to manage both current and future-oriented demands. They'll not only need the skills to initiate those activities or tasks, but also be able to come up with responses, solutions, ideas, or problem-solving strategies to help them get things done.

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  14. Over 100 Executive Functioning IEP Goals

    Example Problem-Solving IEP Goals: Adaptive : By the end of the school year, when given a written scenario in which a problem needs to be solved, the student will provide two appropriate solutions with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 opportunities, according to teacher observation.

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    The Real Life Executive Functioning Skills Assessment is a great place to start. It will tell you all about the skills, weaknesses, and focus areas that you need to target in your student. It will give you a clear idea of what you need to focus on so that you can write goals that are clear and specific. This assessment is a helpful tool both ...

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  17. 432+ Free Measurable IEP Goals and Objectives Bank

    Here is a 432+ free IEP goal bank to make your life easier writing your speech therapy goals and to save you time. ... Functional Life Skills Speech Therapy Goals for Life Skills. General; Conversation; Social Skills; ... -Problem Solving. Given a problem and problem solving graphic organizer, ...

  18. PDF Helpful Hints: IEP Goals Objectives Benchmarks

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